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4 definitions found
 for doubling
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Double \Dou"ble\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Doubled; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Doubling.] [OE. doblen, dublen, doublen, F. doubler, fr. L.
     duplare, fr. duplus. See Double, a.]
     1. To increase by adding an equal number, quantity, length,
        value, or the like; multiply by two; as, to double a sum
        of money; to double a number, or length.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Double six thousand, and then treble that. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To make of two thicknesses or folds by turning or bending
        together in the middle; to fold one part upon another part
        of; as, to double the leaf of a book, and the like; to
        clinch, as the fist; -- often followed by up; as, to
        double up a sheet of paper or cloth. --Prior.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Then the old man
              Was wroth, and doubled up his hands.  --Tennyson.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To be the double of; to exceed by twofold; to contain or
        be worth twice as much as.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Thus re["e]nforced, against the adverse fleet,
              Still doubling ours, brave Rupert leads the way.
                                                    --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To pass around or by; to march or sail round, so as to
        reverse the direction of motion.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Sailing along the coast, the doubled the promontory
              of Carthage.                          --Knolles.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. (Mil.) To unite, as ranks or files, so as to form one from
        each two.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Doubling \Dou"bling\, n.
     1. The act of one that doubles; a making double;
        reduplication; also, that which is doubled.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A turning and winding; as, the doubling of a hunted hare;
        shift; trick; artifice. --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Her.) The lining of the mantle borne about the shield or
        escutcheon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. The process of redistilling spirits, to improve the
        strength and flavor.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. raising the stakes in a game, such as a card game or
        backgammon, by a factor of 2.
  
     Syn: double.
          [WordNet 1.5]
  
     Doubling a cape, promontory, etc. (Naut.), sailing around
        or passing beyond a cape, promontory, etc.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  doubling
      n 1: increase by a factor of two; "doubling with a computer took
           no time at all"
      2: raising the stakes in a card game by a factor of 2; "I
         decided his double was a bluff" [syn: doubling, double]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  87 Moby Thesaurus words for "doubling":
     Janus, ambiguity, ambivalence, biformity, bifurcation, bush,
     bushing, conduplication, conjugation, copying, crease, creasing,
     crimp, dichotomy, dog-ear, double, doubleness, doublethink,
     doublure, dualism, duality, duplexity, duplicate, duplication,
     duplicature, duplicity, echo, equivocality, facing, filler,
     filling, flection, flexure, flounce, fold, frill, gather,
     gemination, halving, imitation, ingemination, inlay, inlayer,
     insole, interlineation, irony, iteration, lapel, lappet, liner,
     lining, packing, padding, pairing, plagiarism, plica, plication,
     plicature, ply, polarity, quotation, reappearance, rebirth,
     recurrence, redoubling, reduplication, reecho, regurgitation,
     reincarnation, reiteration, renewal, reoccurrence, repetition,
     replication, reproduction, resumption, return, ruche, ruching,
     ruffle, stuffing, tuck, twinning, two-facedness, twoness, wadding,
     wainscot
  
  

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