dict.org

The DICT Development Group


Search for:
Search type:
Database:

Database copyright information
Server information
Wiki: Resources, links, and other information


5 definitions found
 for parachute
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Parachute \Par"a*chute\ (p[a^]r"[.a]*sh[=oo]t or
     p[a^]r"[.a]*sh[udd]t), n. [F., fr. parer to ward off, guard +
     chute a fall. See Parry, and Chute, Chance.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. A device made of a piece of cloth, usually silk, attached
        to multiple chords fastened to a harness; when attached to
        a person or object falling through the air, it opens from
        a folded configuration into an umbrella-shaped form, thus
        slowing the rate of descent so that a safe descent and
        landing may be made through the air from an airplane,
        balloon, or other high point. It is commonly used for
        descending to the ground from a flying airplane, as for
        military operations (as of airborne troops) or in an
        emergency, or for sport. In the case of use as a sport,
        the descent from an airplane by parachute is called sky
        diving. Some older versions of parachute were more rigid,
        and were shaped somewhat in the form of an umbrella.
  
     2. (Zool.) A web or fold of skin which extends between the
        legs of certain mammals, as the flying squirrels, colugo,
        and phalangister.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  parachute \par"a*chute\, v. i.
     TO descend to th ground from an airplane or other high place
     using a parachute; as, when the plane stalled, he parachuted
     safely to the ground.
     [PJC]
  
     golden parachute a generous set of financial benefits,
        including severance pay, provided by contract to a
        high-level corporate employee in the event s/he is
        dismissed or his/her job is lost in a corporate takeover
        or merger; also, the contract providing for such benefits.
        
  
     drogue parachute a small parachute that is first released
        and opened in order to more reliably deploy a larger
        parachute. Also called drogue.
        [PJC] parachuter

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  parachute
      n 1: rescue equipment consisting of a device that fills with air
           and retards your fall [syn: parachute, chute]
      v 1: jump from an airplane and descend with a parachute [syn:
           chute, parachute, jump]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  72 Moby Thesaurus words for "parachute":
     Mae West, bail out, breeches buoy, brolly, buoy, cascade, cataract,
     chute, collapse, come down, cork jacket, crash, descend, dip down,
     dive, down, drogue chute, drop, drop down, drop off,
     ejection capsule, ejection seat, ejector seat, fall, fall down,
     fall off, go down, go downhill, gravitate, harness, jump,
     life belt, life buoy, life jacket, life net, life preserver,
     life raft, life ring, life vest, lifeboat, lifeline, lose altitude,
     nose-dive, pack, parachute jump, pitch, plop, plummet, plump,
     plunge, plunk, pounce, pounce on, pounce upon, pour down,
     precipitate, rain, rubber dinghy, safety belt, shroud lines,
     skin-dive, sky dive, sky-dive, sound, stoop, swoop, swoop down,
     take a header, trend downward, umbrella, vent, water wings
  
  

From U.S. Gazetteer Places (2000) :

  Parachute, CO -- U.S. town in Colorado
     Population (2000):    1006
     Housing Units (2000): 415
     Land area (2000):     1.181871 sq. miles (3.061033 sq. km)
     Water area (2000):    0.047887 sq. miles (0.124026 sq. km)
     Total area (2000):    1.229758 sq. miles (3.185059 sq. km)
     FIPS code:            57400
     Located within:       Colorado (CO), FIPS 08
     Location:             39.451732 N, 108.051530 W
     ZIP Codes (1990):    
     Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
     Headwords:
      Parachute, CO
      Parachute
  

Questions or comments about this site? Contact webmaster@dict.org