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5 definitions found
 for without
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Without \With*out"\, prep. [OE. withoute, withouten, AS.
     wi[eth]?tan; wi[eth] with, against, toward + ?tan outside,
     fr. ?t out. See With, prep., Out.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. On or at the outside of; out of; not within; as, without
        doors.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Without the gate
              Some drive the cars, and some the coursers rein.
                                                    --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Out of the limits of; out of reach of; beyond.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Eternity, before the world and after, is without our
              reach.                                --T. Burnet.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Not with; otherwise than with; in absence of, separation
        from, or destitution of; not with use or employment of;
        independently of; exclusively of; with omission; as,
        without labor; without damage.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I wolde it do withouten negligence.   --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Wise men will do it without a law.    --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Without the separation of the two monarchies, the
              most advantageous terms . . . must end in our
              destruction.                          --Addison.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              There is no living with thee nor without thee.
                                                    --Tatler.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To do without. See under Do.
  
     Without day [a translation of L. sine die], without the
        appointment of a day to appear or assemble again; finally;
        as, the Fortieth Congress then adjourned without day.
  
     Without recourse. See under Recourse.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Without \With*out"\, adv.
     1. On or art the outside; not on the inside; not within;
        outwardly; externally.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Without were fightings, within were fears. --2 Cor.
                                                    vii. 5.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Outside of the house; out of doors.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The people came unto the house without. --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Without \With*out"\, conj.
     Unless; except; -- introducing a clause.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           You will never live to my age without you keep
           yourselves in breath with exercise, and in heart with
           joyfulness.                              --Sir P.
                                                    Sidney.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Now rarely used by good writers or speakers.
           [1913 Webster]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  54 Moby Thesaurus words for "without":
     after, apparently, aside from, bar, barring, beside, besides, but,
     discounting, empty of, ex, except, except for, excepting,
     exception taken of, excluding, exclusive of, exteriorly,
     externally, free of, from, lacking, leaving out, less, let alone,
     minus, not counting, off, omitting, on the outside, on the surface,
     open, open air, openly, out, out of doors, out-of-doors, outside,
     outside of, outwardly, outwards, past, precluding, publically,
     sans, save, save and except, saving, superficially, than,
     to all appearances, unless, void of, wanting
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  WITHOUT, pleading. This word is adopted in formal traverses, and is a 
  negative signifying "and not for;" accordingly the language of the elder 
  entries sometimes is, It et nemy pur tiel cause," &c. Hamm. N. P. 120. 
  
  

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