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3 definitions found
 for All in all
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  All \All\, n.
     The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing;
     everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole;
     totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at
     stake.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all.
                                                    --Shak.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           All that thou seest is mine.             --Gen. xxxi.
                                                    43.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: All is used with of, like a partitive; as, all of a
           thing, all of us.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     After all, after considering everything to the contrary;
        nevertheless.
  
     All in all, a phrase which signifies all things to a
        person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly;
        altogether.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee,
              Forever.                              --Milton.
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              Trust me not at all, or all in all.   --Tennyson.
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     All in the wind (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails
        are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake.
        
  
     All told, all counted; in all.
  
     And all, and the rest; and everything connected. "Bring our
        crown and all." --Shak.
  
     At all.
     (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. [Obs.] "She is a
         shrew at al(l)." --Chaucer.
     (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis,
         usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and
         signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or
         to the least extent; in the least; under any
         circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any
         property at all? "Nothing at all." --Shak. "If thy father
         at all miss me." --1 Sam. xx. 6.
  
     Over all, everywhere. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: All is much used in composition to enlarge the meaning,
           or add force to a word. In some instances, it is
           completely incorporated into words, and its final
           consonant is dropped, as in almighty, already, always:
           but, in most instances, it is an adverb prefixed to
           adjectives or participles, but usually with a hyphen,
           as, all-bountiful, all-glorious, allimportant,
           all-surrounding, etc. In others it is an adjective; as,
           allpower, all-giver. Anciently many words, as, alabout,
           alaground, etc., were compounded with all, which are
           now written separately.
           [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  all in all
      adv 1: with everything considered (and neglecting details);
             "altogether, I'm sorry it happened"; "all in all, it's
             not so bad" [syn: all in all, on the whole,
             altogether, tout ensemble]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  46 Moby Thesaurus words for "all in all":
     all things considered, almost entirely, altogether, approximately,
     as a rule, as a whole, as an approximation, at large, broadly,
     broadly speaking, by and large, chiefly, commonly, effectually,
     en masse, essentially, exactly, generally, generally speaking,
     in general, in round numbers, in the main, in toto, just, mainly,
     mostly, normally, on balance, on the average, on the whole,
     ordinarily, overall, predominantly, prevailingly, purely, quite,
     roughly, roughly speaking, routinely, speaking generally,
     substantially, totally, usually, utterly, virtually, wholly
  
  

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