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5 definitions found
 for Backing
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Back \Back\ (b[a^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Backed (b[a^]kt); p.
     pr. & vb. n. Backing.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. To get upon the back of; to mount.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I will back him [a horse] straight.   --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To place or seat upon the back. [R.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Great Jupiter, upon his eagle backed,
              Appeared to me.                       --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To drive or force backward; to cause to retreat or recede;
        as, to back oxen.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To make a back for; to furnish with a back; as, to back
        books.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. To adjoin behind; to be at the back of.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A garden . . . with a vineyard backed. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The chalk cliffs which back the beach. --Huxley.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. To write upon the back of; as, to back a letter; to
        indorse; as, to back a note or legal document.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. To support; to maintain; to second or strengthen by aid or
        influence; as, to back a friend. "The Parliament would be
        backed by the people." --Macaulay.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Have still found it necessary to back and fortify
              their laws with rewards and punishments. --South.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The mate backed the captain manfully. --Blackw. Mag.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     8. To bet on the success of; -- as, to back a race horse.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To back an anchor (Naut.), to lay down a small anchor ahead
        of a large one, the cable of the small one being fastened
        to the crown of the large one.
  
     To back the field, in horse racing, to bet against a
        particular horse or horses, that some one of all the other
        horses, collectively designated "the field", will win.
  
     To back the oars, to row backward with the oars.
  
     To back a rope, to put on a preventer.
  
     To back the sails, to arrange them so as to cause the ship
        to move astern.
  
     To back up, to support; to sustain; as, to back up one's
        friends.
  
     To back a warrant (Law), is for a justice of the peace, in
        the county where the warrant is to be executed, to sign or
        indorse a warrant, issued in another county, to apprehend
        an offender.
  
     To back water (Naut.), to reverse the action of the oars,
        paddles, or propeller, so as to force the boat or ship
        backward.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Backing \Back"ing\, n.
     1. The act of moving backward, or of putting or moving
        anything backward.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. That which is behind, and forms the back of, anything,
        usually giving strength or stability.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Support or aid given to a person or cause.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Bookbinding) The preparation of the back of a book with
        glue, etc., before putting on the cover.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  backing
      n 1: the act of providing approval and support; "his vigorous
           backing of the conservatives got him in trouble with
           progressives" [syn: backing, backup, championship,
           patronage]
      2: something forming a back that is added for strengthening
         [syn: backing, mount]
      3: financial resources provided to make some project possible;
         "the foundation provided support for the experiment" [syn:
         support, financial support, funding, backing,
         financial backing]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  317 Moby Thesaurus words for "backing":
     Brownian movement, Smyth sewing, abetment, about-face, about-turn,
     advance, advocacy, advocate, advocating, aegis, affirmation, aid,
     alpenstock, angular motion, approval, approving, arm, ascending,
     ascent, assistance, athletic supporter, attestation, auspices,
     authentication, axial motion, back, back track, back trail,
     backbone, backflowing, backing off, backing out, backing up,
     backsliding, backup, backward motion, bandeau, bearer, bearing,
     bearing out, bibliofilm, bibliopegy, binder board, binding, bipack,
     black-and-white film, bolstering, book cloth, book cover,
     book jacket, bookbinding, bookcase, bra, brace, bracer, bracket,
     brassiere, bushing, buttress, buttressing, cane, capitalization,
     care, career, carriage, carrier, carrying, cartridge, case,
     casemaking, casing-in, certification, cervix, championship,
     charity, chassis, circumstantiation, climbing, collating,
     collating mark, color film, color negative film, confirmation,
     cooperation, corroboration, corroboratory evidence, corset,
     countenance, course, cover, crook, crutch, current,
     deficit financing, descending, descent, disenchantment,
     documentation, dope, downward motion, drift, driftage, dry plate,
     dust cover, dust jacket, ebbing, emulsion, encouragement,
     endorsement, favor, favorable, favoring, film, financial backing,
     financial support, financing, flight, flip-flop, flow, flux,
     folding, footband, fortification, forward motion, fosterage,
     foundation garment, frame, fulcrum, funding, funds, gathering,
     girdle, gluing-off, goodwill, grant, grubstake, guidance, guy,
     guywire, hard binding, headband, help, infrastructure, interest,
     investment, jacket, jock, jockstrap, lapse, library binding,
     lining, lining-up, mainstay, maintainer, maintenance, mast,
     mechanical binding, microfilm, money, monochromatic film,
     moral support, motion-picture film, mount, mounting, neck,
     negative, niggerhead, oblique motion, ongoing, onrush,
     orthochromatic film, pack, panchromatic film, passage, patronage,
     patronization, perfect binding, photographic paper,
     plastic binding, plate, plunging, printing paper, pro, progress,
     proof, prop, proving, proving out, provision of capital,
     psychological support, radial motion, random motion, ratification,
     recidivation, recidivism, reclamation, reconversion, reflowing,
     refluence, reflux, regress, regression, rehabilitation, reinforce,
     reinforcement, reinforcer, reinstatement, relapse, reliance, rest,
     resting place, restitution, restoration, retrocession,
     retrogradation, retrogression, retroversion, return, returning,
     reversal, reverse, reversing, reversion, reverting, revulsion,
     rigging, right-about, right-about-face, rising, roll, rounding,
     run, rush, saddle stitching, seconding, security blanket, set,
     setting, sewing, shoulder, shroud, side sewing, sideward motion,
     signature, sinking, skeleton, slipcase, slipcover, slipping back,
     smashing, soaring, soft binding, sound film, sound track,
     sound-on-film, soundstripe, spine, spiral binding, sponsorship,
     sprit, staff, stake, stamping, standing rigging, stapling, stave,
     stay, sternway, stick, stiffener, stream, strengthener,
     strengthening, subsiding, subsidy, substantiation, subvention,
     succor, support, supporter, supporting, supporting evidence,
     supportive relationship, supportive therapy, sustainer, sustaining,
     sustainment, sustenance, sustentation, swingaround, sympathy,
     tailband, tipping, traject, trajet, trend, trimming, tripack, turn,
     turnabout, turnaround, tutelage, underframe, undergirding,
     upholder, upholding, upkeep, upward motion, validation, vehicle,
     verification, volte-face, walking stick, well-disposed,
     well-inclined, wire stitching, wrapper
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  BACKING, crim. law practice. Backing a warrant occurs whenever it becomes 
  necessary to execute it out of the jurisdiction of the magistrate who 
  granted it; as when an offender escapes out of the county in which he 
  committed the offence with which he is charged, into another county. In such 
  a case, a magistrate of the county in which the offender may, be found, 
  endorses, or writes his name on the back of the warrant, and thereby gives 
  authority to execute it within his jurisdiction. This is called backing the 
  warrant. This may be from county to county, if necessary. 
  
  

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