dict.org

The DICT Development Group


Search for:
Search type:
Database:

Database copyright information
Server information
Wiki: Resources, links, and other information


2 definitions found
 for Board of trade
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Trade \Trade\, n. [Formerly, a path, OE. tred a footmark. See
     Tread, n. & v.]
     1. A track; a trail; a way; a path; also, passage; travel;
        resort. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A postern with a blind wicket there was,
              A common trade to pass through Priam's house.
                                                    --Surrey.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Hath tracted forth some salvage beastes trade.
                                                    --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Or, I'll be buried in the king's highway,
              Some way of common trade, where subjects' feet
              May hourly trample on their sovereign's head.
                                                    --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Course; custom; practice; occupation; employment. [Obs.]
        "The right trade of religion." --Udall.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              There those five sisters had continual trade.
                                                    --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Long did I love this lady,
              Long was my travel, long my trade to win her.
                                                    --Massinger.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Thy sin's not accidental but a trade. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Business of any kind; matter of mutual consideration;
        affair; dealing. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Have you any further trade with us?   --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Specifically: The act or business of exchanging
        commodities by barter, or by buying and selling for money;
        commerce; traffic; barter.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Trade comprehends every species of exchange or dealing,
           either in the produce of land, in manufactures, in
           bills, or in money; but it is chiefly used to denote
           the barter or purchase and sale of goods, wares, and
           merchandise, either by wholesale or retail. Trade is
           either foreign or domestic. Foreign trade consists in
           the exportation and importation of goods, or the
           exchange of the commodities of different countries.
           Domestic, or home, trade is the exchange, or buying and
           selling, of goods within a country. Trade is also by
           the wholesale, that is, by the package or in large
           quantities, generally to be sold again, or it is by
           retail, or in small parcels. The carrying trade is the
           business of transporting commodities from one country
           to another, or between places in the same country, by
           land or water.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     5. The business which a person has learned, and which he
        engages in, for procuring subsistence, or for profit;
        occupation; especially, mechanical employment as
        distinguished from the liberal arts, the learned
        professions, and agriculture; as, we speak of the trade of
        a smith, of a carpenter, or mason, but not now of the
        trade of a farmer, or a lawyer, or a physician.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Accursed usury was all his trade.     --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The homely, slighted, shepherd's trade. --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I will instruct thee in my trade.     --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. Instruments of any occupation. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The house and household goods, his trade of war.
                                                    --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. A company of men engaged in the same occupation; thus,
        booksellers and publishers speak of the customs of the
        trade, and are collectively designated as the trade.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     8. pl. The trade winds.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     9. Refuse or rubbish from a mine. [Prov. Eng.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Profession; occupation; office; calling; avocation;
          employment; commerce; dealing; traffic.
          [1913 Webster]
  
     Board of trade. See under Board.
  
     Trade dollar. See under Dollar.
  
     Trade price, the price at which goods are sold to members
        of the same trade, or by wholesale dealers to retailers.
        
  
     Trade sale, an auction by and for the trade, especially
        that of the booksellers.
  
     Trade wind, a wind in the torrid zone, and often a little
        beyond at, which blows from the same quarter throughout
        the year, except when affected by local causes; -- so
        called because of its usefulness to navigators, and hence
        to trade.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The general direction of the trade winds is from N. E.
           to S. W. on the north side of the equator, and from S.
           E. to N. W. on the south side of the equator. They are
           produced by the joint effect of the rotation of the
           earth and the movement of the air from the polar toward
           the equatorial regions, to supply the vacancy caused by
           heating, rarefaction, and consequent ascent of the air
           in the latter regions. The trade winds are principally
           limited to two belts in the tropical regions, one on
           each side of the equator, and separated by a belt which
           is characterized by calms or variable weather.
           [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Board \Board\ (b[=o]rd), n. [OE. bord, AS. bord board,
     shipboard; akin to bred plank, Icel. bor[eth] board, side of
     a ship, Goth. f[=o]tu-baurd footstool, D. bord board, G.
     brett, bort. See def. 8. [root]92.]
     1. A piece of timber sawed thin, and of considerable length
        and breadth as compared with the thickness, -- used for
        building, etc.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: When sawed thick, as over one and a half or two inches,
           it is usually called a plank.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A table to put food upon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The term board answers to the modern table, but it was
           often movable, and placed on trestles. --Halliwell.
           [1913 Webster]
  
                 Fruit of all kinds . . .
                 She gathers, tribute large, and on the board
                 Heaps with unsparing hand.         --Milton.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Hence: What is served on a table as food; stated meals;
        provision; entertainment; -- usually as furnished for pay;
        as, to work for one's board; the price of board.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. A table at which a council or court is held. Hence: A
        council, convened for business, or any authorized assembly
        or meeting, public or private; a number of persons
        appointed or elected to sit in council for the management
        or direction of some public or private business or trust;
        as, the Board of Admiralty; a board of trade; a board of
        directors, trustees, commissioners, etc.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Both better acquainted with affairs than any other
              who sat then at that board.           --Clarendon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              We may judge from their letters to the board.
                                                    --Porteus.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. A square or oblong piece of thin wood or other material
        used for some special purpose, as, a molding board; a
        board or surface painted or arranged for a game; as, a
        chessboard; a backgammon board.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. Paper made thick and stiff like a board, for book covers,
        etc.; pasteboard; as, to bind a book in boards.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. pl. The stage in a theater; as, to go upon the boards, to
        enter upon the theatrical profession.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     8. [In this use originally perh. a different word meaning
        border, margin; cf. D. boord, G. bord, shipboard, and G.
        borte trimming; also F. bord (fr. G.) the side of a ship.
        Cf. Border.] The border or side of anything. (Naut.)
        (a) The side of a ship. "Now board to board the rival
            vessels row." --Dryden. See On board, below.
        (b) The stretch which a ship makes in one tack.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Board is much used adjectively or as the last part of a
           compound; as, fir board, clapboard, floor board,
           shipboard, sideboard, ironing board, chessboard,
           cardboard, pasteboard, seaboard; board measure.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     The American Board, a shortened form of "The American Board
        of Commissioners for Foreign Missions" (the foreign
        missionary society of the American Congregational
        churches).
  
     Bed and board. See under Bed.
  
     Board and board (Naut.), side by side.
  
     Board of control, six privy councilors formerly appointed
        to superintend the affairs of the British East Indies.
        --Stormonth.
  
     Board rule, a figured scale for finding without calculation
        the number of square feet in a board. --Haldeman.
  
     Board of trade, in England, a committee of the privy
        council appointed to superintend matters relating to
        trade. In the United States, a body of men appointed for
        the advancement and protection of their business
        interests; a chamber of commerce.
  
     Board wages.
        (a) Food and lodging supplied as compensation for
            services; as, to work hard, and get only board wages.
        (b) Money wages which are barely sufficient to buy food
            and lodging.
        (c) A separate or special allowance of wages for the
            procurement of food, or food and lodging. --Dryden.
  
     By the board, over the board, or side. "The mast went by
        the board." --Totten. Hence (Fig.),
  
     To go by the board, to suffer complete destruction or
        overthrow.
  
     To enter on the boards, to have one's name inscribed on a
        board or tablet in a college as a student. [Cambridge,
        England.] "Having been entered on the boards of Trinity
        college." --Hallam.
  
     To make a good board (Naut.), to sail in a straight line
        when close-hauled; to lose little to leeward.
  
     To make short boards, to tack frequently.
  
     On board.
        (a) On shipboard; in a ship or a boat; on board of; as, I
            came on board early; to be on board ship.
        (b) In or into a railway car or train. [Colloq. U. S.]
  
     Returning board, a board empowered to canvass and make an
        official statement of the votes cast at an election.
        [U.S.]
        [1913 Webster]

Questions or comments about this site? Contact webmaster@dict.org