dict.org

The DICT Development Group


Search for:
Search type:
Database:

Database copyright information
Server information
Wiki: Resources, links, and other information


2 definitions found
 for Bog rush
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rush \Rush\, n. [OE. rusche, rische, resche, AS. risce, akin to
     LG. rusk, risch, D. & G. rusch; all probably fr. L. ruscum
     butcher's broom; akin to Goth. raus reed, G. rohr.]
     1. (Bot.) A name given to many aquatic or marsh-growing
        endogenous plants with soft, slender stems, as the species
        of Juncus and Scirpus.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Some species are used in bottoming chairs and plaiting
           mats, and the pith is used in some places for wicks to
           lamps and rushlights.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The merest trifle; a straw.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              John Bull's friendship is not worth a rush.
                                                    --Arbuthnot.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Bog rush. See under Bog.
  
     Club rush, any rush of the genus Scirpus.
  
     Flowering rush. See under Flowering.
  
     Nut rush
        (a) Any plant of the genus Scleria, rushlike plants with
            hard nutlike fruits.
        (b) A name for several species of Cyperus having
            tuberous roots.
  
     Rush broom, an Australian leguminous plant ({Viminaria
        denudata), having long, slender branches. Also, the
        Spanish broom. See under Spanish.
  
     Rush candle, See under Candle.
  
     Rush grass, any grass of the genus Vilfa, grasses with
        wiry stems and one-flowered spikelets.
  
     Rush toad (Zool.), the natterjack.
  
     Scouring rush. (Bot.) Same as Dutch rush, under Dutch.
        
  
     Spike rush, any rushlike plant of the genus Eleocharis,
        in which the flowers grow in dense spikes.
  
     Sweet rush, a sweet-scented grass of Arabia, etc.
        ({Andropogon schoenanthus), used in Oriental medical
        practice.
  
     Wood rush, any plant of the genus Luzula, which differs
        in some technical characters from Juncus.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  bog \bog\ (b[o^]g), n. [Ir. & Gael. bog soft, tender, moist: cf.
     Ir. bogach bog, moor, marsh, Gael. bogan quagmire.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. A quagmire filled with decayed moss and other vegetable
        matter; wet spongy ground where a heavy body is apt to
        sink; a marsh; a morass.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Appalled with thoughts of bog, or caverned pit,
              Of treacherous earth, subsiding where they tread.
                                                    --R. Jago.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A little elevated spot or clump of earth, roots, and
        grass, in a marsh or swamp. [Local, U. S.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Bog bean. See Buck bean.
  
     Bog bumper (bump, to make a loud noise), Bog blitter,
     Bog bluiter, Bog jumper, the bittern. [Prov.]
  
     Bog butter, a hydrocarbon of butterlike consistence found
        in the peat bogs of Ireland.
  
     Bog earth (Min.), a soil composed for the most part of
        silex and partially decomposed vegetable fiber. --P. Cyc.
  
     Bog moss. (Bot.) Same as Sphagnum.
  
     Bog myrtle (Bot.), the sweet gale.
  
     Bog ore. (Min.)
        (a) An ore of iron found in boggy or swampy land; a
            variety of brown iron ore, or limonite.
        (b) Bog manganese, the hydrated peroxide of manganese.
  
     Bog rush (Bot.), any rush growing in bogs; saw grass.
  
     Bog spavin. See under Spavin.
        [1913 Webster]

Questions or comments about this site? Contact webmaster@dict.org