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5 definitions found
 for Ebony
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Ebony \Eb"on*y\, n.; pl. Ebonies. [F. ['e]b[`e]ne, L. ebenus,
     fr. Gr. ?; prob. of Semitic origin; cf. Heb. hobn[imac]m, pl.
     Cf. Ebon.]
     A hard, heavy, and durable wood, which admits of a fine
     polish or gloss. The usual color is black, but it also occurs
     red or green.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The finest black ebony is the heartwood of Diospyros
           reticulata, of the Mauritius. Other species of the
           same genus ({D. Ebenum, Melanoxylon, etc.), furnish
           the ebony of the East Indies and Ceylon. The West
           Indian green ebony is from a leguminous tree ({Brya
           Ebenus), and from the Exc[ae]caria glandulosa.
           [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Ebony \Eb"on*y\, a.
     Made of ebony, or resembling ebony; black; as, an ebony
     countenance.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           This ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling.
                                                    --Poe.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  ebony
      adj 1: of a very dark black [syn: ebon, ebony]
      n 1: a very dark black [syn: coal black, ebony, jet black,
           pitch black, sable, soot black]
      2: hard dark-colored heartwood of the ebony tree; used in
         cabinetwork and for piano keys
      3: tropical tree of southern Asia having hard dark-colored
         heartwood used in cabinetwork [syn: ebony, ebony tree,
         Diospyros ebenum]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  191 Moby Thesaurus words for "ebony":
     acacia, ailanthus, alder, alligator pear, allspice, almond, apple,
     apricot, ash, aspen, atramentous, avocado, balsa, balsam, banyan,
     bass, basswood, bay, bayberry, beamless, beech, beechwood,
     betel palm, birch, black, black as coal, black as ebony,
     black as ink, black as midnight, black as night, black race,
     blackness, buckeye, burl, butternut, buttonwood, cacao, caliginous,
     candleberry, cashew, cassia, catalpa, charcoal, cherry, chestnut,
     chinquapin, cinnamon, citron, clove, coal, coal-black, coaly,
     coconut, cork, cork oak, crow, cypress, dark, dark as night,
     dark as pitch, darkling, darkness, darksome, deep black, dogwood,
     ebon, eclipsed, elder, elm, eucalyptus, fig, fir, frankincense,
     grapefruit, guava, gum, gumwood, hawthorn, hazel, hemlock, henna,
     hickory, holly, hop tree, horse chestnut, ink, ink-black, inkiness,
     inky, ironwood, jet, jetty, juniper, kumquat, laburnum, lancewood,
     larch, laurel, lemon, lime, linden, litchi, litchi nut, locust,
     logwood, magnolia, mahogany, mango, mangrove, maple, medlar,
     melanism, midnight, mountain ash, mulberry, night, night-black,
     night-clad, night-cloaked, night-dark, night-enshrouded,
     night-filled, night-mantled, night-veiled, nigrescence, nigritude,
     nigrous, nutmeg, oak, obfuscated, obscure, obscured, occulted,
     olive, orange, palm, papaw, papaya, peach, pear, pecan, persimmon,
     pine, pistachio, pitch, pitch-black, pitch-dark, pitchy, plane,
     plum, pomegranate, poplar, quince, raffia palm, rain tree, raven,
     raven-black, rayless, redwood, sable, sandalwood, sassafras, senna,
     sequoia, sloe, sloe-black, sloe-colored, smoke, smut, soot, spruce,
     starless, sumac, sunless, sycamore, tangerine, tar, tar-black,
     tarry, teak, tenebrious, tenebrose, tenebrous, tulip tree,
     unilluminated, unlighted, unlit, walnut, willow, witch hazel,
     yew
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Ebony
     a black, hard wood, brought by the merchants from India to Tyre
     (Ezek. 27:15). It is the heart-wood, brought by Diospyros
     ebenus, which grows in Ceylon and Southern India.
     

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