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3 definitions found
 for Ethic
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Ethic \Eth"ic\, Ethical \Eth"ic*al\, a. [L. ethicus, Gr. ?, fr.
     ? custom, usage, character, dwelling; akin to ? custom, Goth.
     sidus, G. sitte, Skr. svadh?, prob. orig., one's own doing;
     sva self + dh? to set: cf. F. ['e]thique. See So, Do.]
     Of, or belonging to, morals; treating of the moral feelings
     or duties; containing percepts of morality; moral; as, ethic
     discourses or epistles; an ethical system; ethical
     philosophy.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           The ethical meaning of the miracles.     --Trench.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Ethical dative (Gram.), a use of the dative of a pronoun to
        signify that the person or thing spoken of is regarded
        with interest by some one; as, Quid mihi Celsus agit? How
        does my friend Celsus do?
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  ethic \eth"ic\ ([e^]th"[i^]k), n.
     1. the principles of right and wrong that are accepted by an
        individual or a social group; as, the Puritan ethic.
        [WordNet sense 1]
  
     Syn: moral principle, value-system, value orientation.
          [WordNet 1.5]
  
     2. a system of principles governing morality and acceptable
        conduct. [WordNet sense 2]
  
     Syn: ethical code.
          [WordNet 1.5]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  ethic
      n 1: the principles of right and wrong that are accepted by an
           individual or a social group; "the Puritan ethic"; "a
           person with old-fashioned values" [syn: ethic, moral
           principle, value-system, value orientation]
      2: a system of principles governing morality and acceptable
         conduct [syn: ethic, ethical code]

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