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5 definitions found
 for Future
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Future \Fu"ture\, n. [Cf. F. futur. See Future, a.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. Time to come; time subsequent to the present (as, the
        future shall be as the present); collectively, events that
        are to happen in time to come. "Lay the future open."
        --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The possibilities of the future; -- used especially of
        prospective success or advancement; as, he had great
        future before him.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Gram.) A future tense.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To deal in futures, to speculate on the future values of
        merchandise or stocks. [Brokers' cant]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Future \Fu"ture\ (?; 135), a. [F. futur, L. futurus, used as
     fut. p. of esse to be, but from the same root as E. be. See
     Be, v. i.]
     That is to be or come hereafter; that will exist at any time
     after the present; as, the next moment is future, to the
     present.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Future tense (Gram.), the tense or modification of a verb
        which expresses a future act or event.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  future
      adj 1: yet to be or coming; "some future historian will evaluate
             him" [ant: past, present(a)]
      2: effective in or looking toward the future; "he was preparing
         for future employment opportunities"
      3: (of elected officers) elected but not yet serving; "our next
         president" [syn: future(a), next, succeeding(a)]
      4: a verb tense or other formation referring to events or states
         that have not yet happened; "future auxiliary"
      n 1: the time yet to come [syn: future, hereafter,
           futurity, time to come] [ant: past, past times,
           yesteryear]
      2: a verb tense that expresses actions or states in the future
         [syn: future, future tense]
      3: bulk commodities bought or sold at an agreed price for
         delivery at a specified future date

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  122 Moby Thesaurus words for "future":
     Friday, Friday the thirteenth, about to be, affianced, aftertime,
     afterward, already in sight, aorist, appointed lot, approaching,
     astral influences, astrology, at hand, betrothed, book of fate,
     brewing, bride-to-be, by-and-by, close, close at hand, coming,
     constellation, cup, desired, destinal, destination, destined,
     destiny, determined, dies funestis, doom, durative, emergent, end,
     eventual, expected, extrapolated, fatal, fatality, fate, fated,
     fatidic, fiance, fiancee, following, foredoom, forthcoming,
     fortune, future perfect, futuristic, gathering, going to happen,
     hereafter, historical present, hoped-for, ides of March, immediate,
     imminent, impendent, impending, imperfect, in danger imminent,
     in prospect, in reserve, in store, in the cards, in the offing,
     in the wind, in view, inevitability, instant, intended, kismet,
     later, looming, lot, lowering, lurking, menacing, moira, near,
     near at hand, nearing, offing, on the horizon, overhanging, past,
     past perfect, perfect, planets, planned, plotted, pluperfect,
     point tense, portion, predicted, preparing, present,
     present perfect, preterit, probable, progressive tense, projected,
     prophesied, prospective, stars, subsequent, tense, that will be,
     threatening, time to come, to come, to-be, tomorrow, ultimate,
     unborn, unlucky day, upcoming, waiting, weird, wheel of fortune,
     will of Heaven
  
  

From The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906) :

  FUTURE, n.  That period of time in which our affairs prosper, our
  friends are true and our happiness is assured.
  

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