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3 definitions found
 for Letters testamentary
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Letter \Let"ter\, n. [OE. lettre, F. lettre, OF. letre, fr. L.
     littera, litera, a letter; pl., an epistle, a writing,
     literature, fr. linere, litum, to besmear, to spread or rub
     over; because one of the earliest modes of writing was by
     graving the characters upon tablets smeared over or covered
     with wax. --Pliny, xiii. 11. See Liniment, and cf.
     Literal.]
     1. A mark or character used as the representative of a sound,
        or of an articulation of the human organs of speech; a
        first element of written language.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              And a superscription also was written over him in
              letters of Greek, and Latin, and Hebrew. --Luke
                                                    xxiii. 38.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A written or printed communication; a message expressed in
        intelligible characters on something adapted to
        conveyance, as paper, parchment, etc.; an epistle.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The style of letters ought to be free, easy, and
              natural.                              --Walsh.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. A writing; an inscription. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              None could expound what this letter meant.
                                                    --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Verbal expression; literal statement or meaning; exact
        signification or requirement.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              We must observe the letter of the law, without doing
              violence to the reason of the law and the intention
              of the lawgiver.                      --Jer. Taylor.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I broke the letter of it to keep the sense.
                                                    --Tennyson.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. (Print.) A single type; type, collectively; a style of
        type.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Under these buildings . . . was the king's printing
              house, and that famous letter so much esteemed.
                                                    --Evelyn.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. pl. Learning; erudition; as, a man of letters.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. pl. A letter; an epistle. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     8. (Teleg.) A telegram longer than an ordinary message sent
        at rates lower than the standard message rate in
        consideration of its being sent and delivered subject to
        priority in service of regular messages. Such telegrams
        are called by the Western Union Company day letters, or
        night letters according to the time of sending, and by
        The Postal Telegraph Company day lettergrams, or night
        lettergrams.
        [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
  
     Dead letter, Drop letter, etc. See under Dead, Drop,
        etc.
  
     Letter book, a book in which copies of letters are kept.
  
     Letter box, a box for the reception of letters to be mailed
        or delivered.
  
     Letter carrier, a person who carries letters; a postman;
        specif., an officer of the post office who carries letters
        to the persons to whom they are addressed, and collects
        letters to be mailed.
  
     Letter cutter, one who engraves letters or letter punches.
        
  
     Letter lock, a lock that can not be opened when fastened,
        unless certain movable lettered rings or disks forming a
        part of it are in such a position (indicated by a
        particular combination of the letters) as to permit the
        bolt to be withdrawn.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A strange lock that opens with AMEN.  --Beau. & Fl.
  
     Letter paper, paper for writing letters on; especially, a
        size of paper intermediate between note paper and
        foolscap. See Paper.
  
     Letter punch, a steel punch with a letter engraved on the
        end, used in making the matrices for type.
  
     Letters of administration (Law), the instrument by which an
        administrator or administratrix is authorized to
        administer the goods and estate of a deceased person.
  
     Letter of attorney, Letter of credit, etc. See under
        Attorney, Credit, etc.
  
     Letter of license, a paper by which creditors extend a
        debtor's time for paying his debts.
  
     Letters close or Letters clause (Eng. Law.), letters or
        writs directed to particular persons for particular
        purposes, and hence closed or sealed on the outside; --
        distinguished from letters patent. --Burrill.
  
     Letters of orders (Eccl.), a document duly signed and
        sealed, by which a bishop makes it known that he has
        regularly ordained a certain person as priest, deacon,
        etc.
  
     Letters patent, Letters overt, or Letters open (Eng.
        Law), a writing executed and sealed, by which power and
        authority are granted to a person to do some act, or enjoy
        some right; as, letters patent under the seal of England.
        The common commercial patent is a derivative form of
        such a right.
  
     Letter-sheet envelope, a stamped sheet of letter paper
        issued by the government, prepared to be folded and sealed
        for transmission by mail without an envelope.
  
     Letters testamentary (Law), an instrument granted by the
        proper officer to an executor after probate of a will,
        authorizing him to act as executor.
  
     Letter writer.
        (a) One who writes letters.
        (b) A machine for copying letters.
        (c) A book giving directions and forms for the writing of
            letters.
            [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  letters testamentary
      n 1: a legal document from a probate court or court officer
           informing you of your appointment as executor of a will and
           empowering you to discharge those responsibilities

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  LETTERS TESTAMENTARY, AND OF ADMINISTRATION. It is proposed to consider, 1. 
  Their different kinds. 2. Their effect. 
       2.-1. Their different kinds. 1. Letters testamentary. This is an 
  instrument in writing, granted by the judge or officer having jurisdiction 
  of the probate of wills, under his hand and official seal, making known that 
  on the day of the date of the said letters, the last will of the testator, 
  (naming him,) was duly proved before him; that the testator left goods, &c., 
  by reason, whereof, and the probate of the said will, he certifies "that 
  administration of all and singular, the goods, chattels, rights and credits 
  of the said deceased, any way concerning his last will and testament, was 
  committed to the executor, (naming him,) in the said testament named." 2. 
  Letters of administration may be described to be an instrument in writing, 
  granted by the judge or officer having jurisdiction and power of granting 
  such letters, thereby giving the administrator, (naming him,)," full power 
  to administer the goods, chattels, rights and credits, which were of the 
  said deceased, in the county or, district in which the said judge or officer 
  has jurisdiction; as also to ask, collect, levy, recover and receive the 
  credits whatsoever, of the said deceased, which at the time of his death 
  were owing, or did in any way belong to him, and to pay the debts in which 
  the said deceased stood obliged, so far forth as the said goods and 
  chattels, rights and credits will extend, according, to the rate and order 
  of law." 3. Letters of administration pendente lite, are letters granted 
  during the pendency of a suit in relation to a paper purporting to be the 
  last will and testament of the deceased. 4. Letters of administration de 
  bonis non, are granted, where the former executor or administrator did not 
  administer all the personal estate of the deceased, and where he is dead or 
  has been discharged or dismissed. Letters of administration, durante minori 
  aetate, are granted where the testator, by his will, appoints an infant 
  executor, who is incapable of acting on account of his infancy. Such letters 
  remain in force until the infant arrives at an age to take upon himself the 
  execution of the will. Com. Dig. Administration, F; Off. Ex. 215, 216. And 
  see 6 Rep. 67, b; 5 Rep. 29, a; 11 Vin. Abr. 103; Bac. Ab. h.t. 6. Letters 
  of administration durante absentia, are granted when the executor happens to 
  be absent at the time when the testator died, and it is necessary that some 
  person should act immediately in the management of the affairs of the 
  estate. 
       3.-2. Of their effect. 1. Generally. 2. Of their effect in the 
  different states, when granted out of the state in which legal proceedings 
  are instituted. 
       4.-1. Letters testamentary are conclusive as to personal property, 
  while they remain unrevoked; as to realty they are merely prima facie 
  evidence of right. 3 Binn. 498; Gilb. Ev. 66;. 6 Binn. 409; Bac. Abr. 
  Evidence, F. See 2 Binn. 511. Proof that the testator was insane, or that 
  the will was forged, is inadmissible. 16 Mass. 433; 1 Lev. 236. But if the 
  nature of his plea allow the defendant to enter into such proof, he may show 
  that the seal of the supposed probate has been forged, or that the letters 
  have been obtained by surprise; 1 Lev. 136; or been revoked;  15 Serg. & 
  Rawle, 42; or that the testator is alive. 15 Serg. & Rawle, 42; 3 T. R. 130. 
       5.-2. The effect of letters testamentary, and of administration 
  granted, in some one of the United States, is different in different states. 
  A brief view of the law on this subject will here be given, taking the 
  states in alphabetical order. 
       6. Alabama. Administrators may sue upon letters of administration 
  granted in another state, where the intestate had no known place of 
  residence in Alabama at the time of his death, and no representative has 
  been appointed in the state; but before rendition of the judgment, he must 
  produce to the court his letters of administration, authenticated according 
  to the laws of the United States, and the certificate of the clerk of some 
  county court in this state, that the letters have been recorded in his 
  office. Before he is entitled to the money on the judgment, he must also 
  give bond, payable to the judge of the court where the judgment is rendered, 
  for the faithful administration of the money received. Aiken's Dig. 183 
  Toulm. Dig. 342. 
       7. Arkansas. When the deceased had no residence in Arkansas, and he 
  devised lands by will, or where the intestate died possessed of lands, 
  letters testamentary or of administration shall be granted in the county 
  where the lands lie, or of one of them, if they lie in several counties; and 
  if the deceased had no such place of residence and no lands, such letters 
  may be granted in the county in which the testator or intestate died, or 
  where the greater part of his estate may be. Rev. Stat. c. s. 2. 
       8. Connecticut. Letters testamentary issued in another state, are not 
  available in this. 3 Day 303. Nor are letters of administration. 3 Day, 74; 
  and see 2 Root, 462. 
       9. Delaware. By the act of 1721, 1 State Laws, 82, it is declared in 
  substance, that when any person shall die, leaving bona notabilia, in 
  several counties in the state and in Pennsylvania or elsewhere; and, any 
  person not residing in the state, obtains letters of administration out of 
  the state, the deceased being indebted to any of the inhabitants of the 
  state, for a debt contracted within the same to the value of 20, then, and 
  in such case, such administrator, before he can obtain any judgment in any 
  court of record within the state against any inhabitant thereof, by virtue 
  of such letters of administration, is obliged to file them with some of the 
  registers in this state; and must enter into bonds with sufficient sureties, 
  who have visible estates here, with condition to pay and satisfy all such 
  debts as were owing by the intestate at the time of his death to any person 
  residing in this state, so far as the effects of the deceased in this state 
  will extend. By the act of June 16, 1769, 1 State Laws, 448, it is enacted 
  in substance that any will in writing made by a person residing out of the 
  state, whereby any lands within the state are devised, which shall be proved 
  in the chancery in England, Scotland, Ireland, or any colony, plantation, or 
  island in America, belonging to the king of Great Britain, or in the 
  hustings, or mayor's court, in London, or in some manor court, or before 
  such persons as have power or authority at the time of proving such wills, 
  in the places aforesaid, to take probates of wills, shall be good and 
  available in law for granting the lands devised, as well as of the goods and 
  chattels bequeathed by such will. The copies of such will, and of the bill, 
  answer, depositions and decree, where proved in any court of chancery, or 
  copies of such wills and the probate thereof, where proved in any other 
  court, or in any office as aforesaid, being transmitted to this state, and 
  produced under the public or common-seal of the court or office where the 
  probate is taken, or under the great seal of the kingdom, colony, plantation 
  or island, within which such will is proved (except copies of such wills and 
  probates as shall appear to be revoked), are declared to be matter of 
  record, and to be good evidence in an any court of law or equity in this 
  state, to prove the gift or devise made in such will; and such probates are 
  declared to be sufficient to enable executors to bring their actions within 
  any court within this state, as if the same probates or letters testamentary 
  were granted here, and produced under the seal of any of the registers 
  offices within this state. By the 3d section of the act, it is declared that 
  the copies of such wills and probates so produced, and given in evidence, 
  shall not be returned by the court to the persons producing them, but shall 
  be recorded in the office of the recorder of the county where the same are 
  given in evidence, at the expense of the party producing the same. 
      10. Florida. Copies of all wills, and letters testamentary and of 
  administration, heretofore recorded in any public office of record in the 
  state, when duly certified by the keeper of said records, shall be received 
  in evidence in all courts of record in this state and the probate of wills 
  granted in any of the United States or of the territories thereof, in any 
  foreign country or state, duly authenticated and certified according to the 
  laws of the state or territory, or of the foreign country or state, where 
  such probate may have been granted, shall likewise be received in evidence 
  in all courts of record in this state. 
      11. Georgia. To enable executors and administrators to sue in Georgia, 
  the former must take out letters testamentary in the county where the 
  property or debt is; and administrators, letters of administration. Prince's 
  Dig. 238; Act of 1805, 2 Laws of Geo. 268. 
      12. Illinois. Letters testamentary must be taken out in this state, and 
  when the will is to be proved, the original must be produced; administrators 
  of other states must take out letters in Illinois, before they can maintain 
  an action in the courts of the state. 3 Grif. Reg. 419. 
      13. Indiana. Executors and administrators appointed in another state may 
  maintain actions and suits and do all other acts coming within their powers, 
  as such, within this state, upon producing authenticated copies of such 
  letters and filing them with the clerk of the court in which such suits are 
  to be brought. Rev. Code, c. 24, Feb. 17, 1838, sec. 44. 
      14. Kentucky executors and administrators appointed in other states may 
  sue in Kentucky "upon filing with the clerk of the court where the suit is 
  brought, an authenticated copy of the certificate of probate, or orders 
  granting letters of administration of said estate, given in such non-
  resident's  state." 1 Dig. Stat. 536; 2 Litt. 194; 3 Litt. 182. 
      15. Louisiana. Executors or administrators of other states must take out 
  letters of curatorship in this state. Exemplifications of wills, and 
  testaments are evidence. 4 Griff. L. R. 683; 8 N. S. 586. 
      16. Maine. Letters of administration must be taken from some court of 
  probate in this state. Copies of wills which have been proved in a court of 
  probate in any of the United States, or in a court of probate of any other 
  state or kingdom, with a copy of the probate thereof, under the seal of the 
  court where such wills have been proved, may be filed and recorded in any 
  probate court in this state, which recording shall be of the same force as 
  the recording and proving the original will. Rev. Stat. T. 9, c. 107 Sec. 
  20; 3 Mass, 514; 9 Mass. 337; 11 Mass. 256; 1 Pick. 80; 3 Pick. 128. 
      17. Maryland. Letters testamentary or of administration granted out of 
  Maryland have no effect in this state, except only such letters issued in 
  the District of Columbia, and letters granted there authorize executors or 
  administrators to claim and sue in this state. Act of April 1813, chap. 165. 
  By the act of 1839, chap. 41, when non-resident owners of any public or 
  state of Maryland stocks, or stocks of the city of Baltimore, or any other 
  corporation in this state die, their executors or administrators constituted 
  under the authority of the state, district, territory or country, where the 
  deceased resided at his death, have the same power as to such stocks, as if 
  they were appointed by authority of the state of Maryland. But, before they 
  can transfer the stocks, they must, during three months, give notice to two 
  newspapers published in Baltimore, of the death of the testator or 
  intestate, and of the "amount and description of the stock designed to be 
  transferred." Administration must be granted in this state, in order to 
  recover a debt due here to a decedent, or any of his property, with the 
  exceptions above noticed. 
      18. Massachusetts. When any person shall die intestate in any other 
  state or country, leaving estate to be administered within this state, 
  administration thereof shall be granted by the judge of probate of any 
  county, in which there is any estate to be administered; and the 
  administration, which shall be first lawfully granted shall extend to all 
  the estate of the deceased within the state, and shall exclude the 
  jurisdiction of the probate court in every other county. Rev. Stat., ch. 64, 
  s. 3. See 3 Mass. 514; 5 Mass. 67; 11 Mass. 256 Id. 314; 1 Pick. 81. 
      19. Michigan. Letters testamentary or letters of administration granted 
  out of the state are not of any validity in it. In order to collect the 
  debts or to obtain the property a deceased person who was not a resident of 
  the state, it is requisite to take out letters testamentary or letters of 
  administration from a probate court of this stafe, within whose jurisdiction 
  the property lies, which letters operate over all the state, and then sue in 
  the name of the executor or administrator so appointed. Rev. Stat. 280. When 
  the deceased leaves a will executed according to the laws of this state, and 
  the same is admitted to proof and record where he dies, a certified 
  transcript of the will and probate thereof, may be proved and recorded in 
  any county in this state, where the deceased has property real or personal, 
  and letters testamentary may issue thereon. Rev. Stat. 272, 273. 
      2O. Mississippi. Executors or administrators in another state or 
  territory cannot as such, sue nor be sued in this state. In order to recover 
  a debt due to a deceased person or his property, there must be taken out in 
  the state, letters of administration or letters with the will annexed, as 
  the case may  be. These may be taken out from the probate court of the 
  county where the proprty is situated, by a foreign as well as a local 
  creditor, or any person interested in the estate of the deceased, if 
  properly qualified in other  respects. Walker's R. 211. 
      21. Missouri. Letters testamentary or of administration granted in 
  another state have no validity in this; to maintain a suit, the executors or 
  administrators must be appointed under the laws of this state. Rev. Code, 
  Sec. 2, pt 41. 
      22. New Hampshire. One who has obtained letters of administrition; 
  Adams' Rep. 193, or letters testamentary under the authority of another 
  state, cannot maintain an action in New Hampshire by virtue of such letters. 
  3 Griff. L. R. 41. 
      23. New Jersey. Executors having letter testamentary, and administrators 
  letters of administration granted in another state, cannot sue thereon in 
  New Jersey, but must obtain such letters in that state as the law 
  prescribes. 4 Griff. L R. 1240. By the act of March 6, 1828, Harr. Comp. 
  195, when a will has been admitted to probate in any state or territory of 
  the United States, or foreign nation, the surrogate of any county or this 
  state is authorized, on application of the executor or any person interested,
  
  on filing a duly exemplified copy of the will, to appoint a time not less 
  than thirty days, and not more than six-months distant, of which notice is 
  to be given as he shall direct, and if at such time, no sufficient reason be 
  shown to the contrary, to a omit such will to probate, and grant letters 
  testamentary or of administration cum testamento annexo, which shall have 
  the same effect as though the original will had been produced and proved 
  under form. If the person to whom such letters testamentary or of 
  administration be granted, is not a resident of this state, he is required 
  to give security for the faithful administration of the estate. By the 
  statute passed February 28, 1838, Elmer's Dig. 602, no instrument of writing 
  can be admitted to probate under the preceding act unless it be signed and 
  published by the testator as his will. See Saxton's Ch. R. 332. 
      24. New York. An executor or administrator appointed in another state 
  has no authority to sue in New York. 6 John. Ch. Rep. 353; 7 John. Ch. Rep. 
  45; 1 Johns. Ch. Rep. 153. Whenever an intestate, not being an inhabitant of 
  this state, shall die out of the state, leaving assets in several counties, 
  or assets shall after his death come in several counties, the surrogate of 
  any county in which assets shall be, shall have power to grant letters of 
  administration on the estate of such intestate; but the surrogate, who shall 
  first grant letters of administration on such estate, shall be deemed 
  thereby to have acquired sole and exclusive jurisdiction over such estate, 
  and shall be vested with the powers incidental thereto. Rev. Stat. part 2, 
  c. 6. tit. 2, art. 2, s. 24; 1 R. L. 455 Sec. 3; Laws, of 1823, p. 62, s. 2, 
  1824, p. 332. 
      25. North Carolina. It was decided by the court of conference, then the 
  highest tribunal in North Carolina, that letters granted in Georgia were 
  insufficient. Conf. Rep. 68. But the supreme court have since held that 
  letters testamentary granted in South Carolina, were sufficient to enable an 
  executor to sue in North Carolina. 1 Car. Law Repos. 471. See 1 Heyw. 364. 
      26. By the revised statutes, ch. 46, s. 6, it is provided, that "where a 
  testator or testatrix shall appoint any person, residing out of this state, 
  executor or executrix of his or her last will and testament, it shall be the 
  duty of the court of pleas and quarter sessions, before which the said will 
  shall be offered for probate, to cause the executor or executrix named 
  therein, to enter into bond with good and sufficient security for his or her 
  faithful administration of the estate of the said testator or testatrix and 
  for the distribution thereof in the manner prescribed by law; the penalty of 
  said bond shall be double the supposed amount of the personal estate of the 
  said testator or testatrix; and until the said executor or executrix shall 
  enter into such bond, he or she shall have no power nor authority to 
  intermeddle with the estate of the said testator or testatrix; and the court 
  of the county in which the testator or testatrix had his or her last usual 
  place of residence, shall proceed to, grant letters of administration with 
  the will annexed, which shall continue in force until the said executor or 
  executrix shall enter into bond as aforesaid. Provided nevertheless, and it 
  is hereby declared, that the said executor or executrix shall enter into 
  bond as by this act directed within the space of one year after the death of 
  the said testator, or testatrix, and not afterwards." 
      27. Ohio. Executors and administrators appointed under the authority of 
  another state, may, by virtue of such appointment, sue in this. Ohio Stat. 
  vol. 38, p. 146; Act. of March 23, 1840, which, went into effect the first 
  day of November following; Swan's Coll. 184. 
      28. Pennsylvania. Letters testamentary or of administration, or 
  otherwise purporting to authorize any person to intermeddle with the estate 
  of a decedent, granted out of the commonwealth, do not in general confer on 
  any such person any of the powers, and authorities possessed by an executor 
  or administrator, under letters granted within the state. Act of March 15, 
  1832 s. 6. But by the act of April 14, 1835, s. 3, this rule is declared not 
  to apply to any public debt or loan of this commonwealth; but such public 
  debt or loan shall pass and be transferable, and the dividends thereon 
  accrued and to accrue, be receivable in like manner and in all respects and 
  under the same and no other regulations, powers and authorities as were used 
  and practiced before the passage of the above mentioned act. And the act of 
  June 16, 1836, s. 3, declares that the above act of March 15, 1832, s. 6, 
  shall not apply to shares of stock in any bank or other incorporated 
  company, within this commonwealth, but such shares of stock shall pass and 
  be transferable, and the dividends thereon accrued and to accrue, be 
  receivable in like manner in all respects, and under the same regulations, 
  powers and authorities as were used and practiced with the loans or public 
  debts of the United States and were used and practiced with the loans or 
  public debt of this commonwealth, before the passage of the, said act of 
  March 15, 1832, s. 6, unless the by-laws, rules and regulations of any such 
  bank or corporation, shall, otherwise provide and declare. Executors and 
  administrators who had been lawfully appointed in some other of the United 
  States, might, by virtue of their letters duly authenticated by the proper 
  officer, have sued in this state. 4 Dall. 492; S. C. 1 Binn. 63. But letters 
  of administration granted by the archbishop of York, in England, give no 
  authority to the administrator in Pennsylvania. 1 Dall. 456. 
      29. Rhode Island. It does not appear to be settled whether executors and 
  administrators appointed in another state, may, by virtue of such 
  appointment, sue in this. 3 Griff. L. R. 107, 8. 
      30. South Carolina. Executors and administrators of other states, 
  cannot, as such, sue in South Carolina; they must take out letters in the 
  state. 3 Griff. L. R. 848. 
      31. Tennessee. 1. Where any person or persons may obtain, administration 
  on the estate of any intestate, in any one of the United States, or 
  territory thereof, such person or persons shall be enabled to prosecute 
  suits in any court in this state, in the same manner as if administration 
  had been granted to such person or persons by any court in the state of 
  Tennessee. Provided, that such person or persons shall, produce a copy of 
  the letters of administration, authenticated in the manner which has been 
  prescribed by the congress of the United States, for authenticating the 
  records or judicial acts of any one state, in order to give them validity in 
  any other state and that such letters of administration had been granted in 
  pursuance of, and agreeable to the laws of the state or territory in which 
  such letters of administration were granted. 
      32.-2. When any executor or executors may prove the last will and 
  testament of any deceased person, and take on him or themselves the 
  execution of said will in any state in the United States, or in any 
  territory thereof, such person or persons shall be enabled to prosecute 
  suits in any court in this state, in the same manner as if letters 
  testamentary had been granted to him or them, by any court within the state 
  of Tennessee. Provided, That such executor or executors shall, produce a 
  certified copy of the letters testamentary under the hand and seal of the 
  clerk of the court where the same were obtained, and a certificate by the 
  chief justice, presiding judge, or chairman of such court, that the clerk's 
  certificate is in due form, and that such letters testamentary had been 
  granted in pursuance of, and agreeable to, the laws of the state or 
  territory in which such letters testamentary were granted. Act of 1839, 
  Carr. & Nich. Comp. 78. 
      33. Vermont. If the deceased person shall, at the time of his death, 
  reside in any other state or country, leaving estate to be administered in 
  this state, administration thereof shall be granted by the probate court of 
  the district in which there shall be estate to administer; and the 
  administration first legally granted, shall extend to all the estate of the 
  deceased in this state, and shall exclude the jurisdiction of the probate 
  court of every other district. Rev. Stat. tit. 12, c. 47, s. 2. 
      34. Virginia. Authenticated copies of wills, proved according to the 
  laws of any of the United States, or of any foreign country, relative to any 
  estate in Virginia, may be offered for probate in the general court, or if 
  the estate lie altogether in any other county or corporation, in the 
  circuit, county or corporation court of such county or corporation. 3 Griff. 
  L. R. 345. It is understood to be the settled law of Virginia, though there 
  is no statutory provision on the subject, that no probate of a will or grant 
  of administration in another state of the Union, or in a foreign country, 
  and no qualification of an executor or administrator, elsewhere than in 
  Virginia, give any such executor or administrator any right to demand the 
  effects or debts of the decedent, which may happen to be within the 
  jurisdiction of the state. There must be a regular probate or grant of 
  administration and qualification of the executor or administrator in 
  Virginia, according to her laws. And the doctrine prevails in the federal 
  courts held in Virginia, as well as in the state courts. 3 Grif. Reg. 348. 
  
  

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