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6 definitions found
 for Limber
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Limber \Lim"ber\ v. t. [imp. & p. p. Limbered
     (l[i^]m"b[~e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Limbering.] (Mil.)
     To attach to the limber; as, to limber a gun.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     To limber up, to change a gun carriage into a four-wheeled
        vehicle by attaching the limber.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Limber \Lim"ber\, a. [Akin to limp, a. [root]125. See Limp,
     a.]
     Easily bent; flexible; pliant; yielding. --Milton.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           The bargeman that doth row with long and limber oar.
                                                    --Turbervile.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Limber \Lim"ber\ (l[i^]m"b[~e]r), n. [For limmer, Icel. limar
     branches, boughs, pl. of lim; akin to E. limb. See Limb a
     branch.]
     1. pl. The shafts or thills of a wagon or carriage. [Prov.
        Eng.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. (Mil.) The detachable fore part of a gun carriage,
        consisting of two wheels, an axle, and a shaft to which
        the horses are attached. On top is an ammunition box upon
        which the cannoneers sit.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. pl. (Naut.) Gutters or conduits on each side of the
        keelson to afford a passage for water to the pump well.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Limber boards (Naut.), short pieces of plank forming part
        of the lining of a ship's floor immediately above the
        timbers, so as to prevent the limbers from becoming
        clogged.
  
     Limber box or Limber chest (Mil.), a box on the limber
        for carrying ammunition.
  
     Limber rope, Limber chain or Limber clearer (Naut.), a
        rope or chain passing through the limbers of a ship, by
        which they may be cleared of dirt that chokes them.
        --Totten.
  
     Limber strake (Shipbuilding), the first course of inside
        planking next the keelson.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Limber \Lim"ber\, v. t.
     To cause to become limber; to make flexible or pliant.
     --Richardson.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  limber
      adj 1: (used of e.g. personality traits) readily adaptable; "a
             supple mind"; "a limber imagination" [syn: limber,
             supple]
      2: (used of artifacts) easily bent
      3: (used of persons' bodies) capable of moving or bending freely
         [syn: limber, supple]
      n 1: a two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle used to pull a field gun
           or caisson
      v 1: attach the limber; "limber a cannon" [syn: limber,
           limber up]
      2: cause to become limber; "The violist limbered her wrists
         before the concert"

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  86 Moby Thesaurus words for "limber":
     adaptable, anemic, asthenic, bendable, bending, bloodless, chicken,
     compliant, cowardly, debilitated, drooping, droopy, ductile, dull,
     effete, elastic, etiolated, extensible, extensile, fabricable,
     facile, faint, faintish, feeble, fictile, flabby, flaccid,
     flexible, flexile, flexuous, floppy, formable, formative, giving,
     gone, gutless, imbecile, impotent, impressible, impressionable,
     languid, languorous, like putty, limp, lissome, listless, lithe,
     lithesome, lustless, malleable, marrowless, moldable, nerveless,
     pithless, plastic, pliable, pliant, pooped, powerless, receptive,
     resilient, responsive, rubbery, sapless, sensitive, sequacious,
     shapable, sinewless, slack, soft, spineless, springy, strengthless,
     submissive, supple, susceptible, tractable, tractile, unhardened,
     unnerved, unstrung, weak, weakly, whippy, willowy, yielding
  
  

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