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3 definitions found
 for MEGO
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  MEGO \MEGO\, n. [My eyes glaze over.]
     A very dull article, speech, or book, which causes the reader
     or listener to rapidly lose interest; -- often used of
     involved discussions of a technical nature, especially in
     newspapers. [Acronym, Slang]
     [PJC]

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  MEGO
   /me'goh/, /mee?goh/
  
      [?My Eyes Glaze Over?, often ?Mine Eyes Glazeth (sic) Over?, attributed to
      the futurologist Herman Kahn] Also MEGO factor.
  
      1. n. A handwave intended to confuse the listener and hopefully induce
      agreement because the listener does not want to admit to not understanding
      what is going on. MEGO is usually directed at senior management by
      engineers and contains a high proportion of TLAs.
  
      2. excl. An appropriate response to MEGO tactics.
  
      3. Among non-hackers, often refers not to behavior that causes the eyes to
      glaze, but to the eye-glazing reaction itself, which may be triggered by
      the mere threat of excessive technical detail as effectively as by an
      actual excess of it.
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  MEGO
  
     /me"goh/ or /mee'goh/ ["My Eyes Glaze Over", often "Mine Eyes
     Glazeth (sic) Over", attributed to the futurologist Herman
     Kahn] Also "MEGO factor".  1.  A handwave intended to
     confuse the listener and hopefully induce agreement because
     the listener does not want to admit to not understanding what
     is going on.  MEGO is usually directed at senior management by
     engineers and contains a high proportion of TLAs.
     2. excl. An appropriate response to MEGO tactics.  3. Among
     non-hackers, often refers not to behaviour that causes the
     eyes to glaze, but to the eye-glazing reaction itself, which
     may be triggered by the mere threat of technical detail as
     effectively as by an actual excess of it.
  

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