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2 definitions found
 for Maryland
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  Maryland
      n 1: a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies [syn:
           Maryland, Old Line State, Free State, MD]
      2: one of the British colonies that formed the United States

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MARYLAND. One of the original states of the United States of America. The 
  province of Maryland was included in the patent of the Southern or Virginia 
  company; and upon the dissolution of that company, it reverted to the crown. 
  Charles the First, on the 20th of June, 1632, granted it by patent to Lord 
  Baltimore. Under this charter Maryland continued to be governed, with some 
  short intervals of interruption, down to the period of the American 
  Revolution, by the successors of the original proprietor. 1 Chalmer's 
  Annals, 203. 
       2. Upon the revolution of 1688, the government of Maryland was seised 
  into the hands of the crown, and was not again restored to the proprietary 
  until 1716; from that period no alteration occurred until the American 
  Revolution. Bacon's Laws of Maryland, 1692, 1716. 
       3. The original constitution of this state was adopted on the 14th day 
  of August, 1776. The present constitution was adopted in 1851. 
       4. The powers of the government are distributed into the legislative, 
  the executive, and the judicial. 
       5.-1st. The legislature shall consist of two distinct branches, a 
  senate and a house of delegates, which shall be styled "The general assembly 
  of Maryland." Art. III. s. 1. 
       6.-2. The general assembly shall meet on the first Wednesday of 
  January, 1852, on the same day, in the year 1853, and on the same day, 1854, 
  and on the same day in every second year thereafter, and at no other time, 
  unless convened by the proclamation of the governor. Art. III. s. 7. 
       7.-3. The senate will be considered with reference to the 
  qualification of the electors; the qualification of the members; the length 
  of time for which they are elected; and the time of their election. 1. Every 
  free white male person of twenty-one years of age or upwards, who shall have 
  been one year next preceding the election a resident of the state, and for 
  six months a resident of the city of Baltimore, or of any county in which he 
  may offer to vote, and being at the time of the election, a citizen of the 
  United States, shall be entitled to vote in the ward or election district in 
  which he resides, in all elections hereafter to be held; an& at all such 
  elections the vote shall be taken by ballot. And in case any county or city 
  shall be so divided as to form portions of different electoral districts for 
  the election of congressmen, senator, delegate or other officer or officers, 
  then to entitle a person to vote for such officer, he must have been a 
  resident of that part of the county or city which shall form a part of the 
  electoral district in which he offers to vote for six months next preceding 
  the election: but a person who shall have acquired a residence in such 
  county or city, entitling him to vote at any such election, shall be 
  entitled to vote in the election district from which he remoted, until he 
  shall have acquired a residence in the part of the county or city to which 
  he has removed. Art. I. s. 1. 2. No person shall be eligible as a senator 
  who at the time of his election is not a citizen of the United States, and 
  who bas not resided at least three years next preceding the day of his 
  election, in this state, and the last year thereof in the county or city 
  which he may be chosen to represent, if such county or city shall have been 
  so long established, and if not, then in the county from which, in whole or 
  in part, the same may have been formed; nor shall any person be eligible as 
  a senator unless he shall have attained the age of twenty-five years. No 
  member of congress, or person holding any civil or military office under the 
  United States, shall be eligible as a senator; and if any person, after his 
  election as a senator, be elected to congress, or be appointed to any 
  office, civil or military, under the government of the United States, his 
  acceptance thereof shall vacate his seat. No minister or preacher of the 
  gospel of any denomination, and no person holding any civil office of profit 
  or trust under the state, except justices of the peace, shall be eligible as 
  senator. Art. III. ss. 9, 10, 11. 3. Every county of the state, and the city 
  of Baltimore, shall be entitled to elect one senator, who shall serve for 
  four years from the day of their election. The first election shall take 
  place on the first Wednesday of November, 1851, and an election for one-half 
  the senators, as nearly as practicable, shall be held on the same day every 
  second year thereafter. Art. III. 2, 3, 4, 5. 
       8.-4. The house of delegates will be treated of in the same manner 
  which has been observed in considering the senate. 1. The electors are 
  qualified in the same manner as the electors of the senate. 2. No person 
  shall be a delegate who shall not have attained the age of twenty-one years; 
  the other qualifications are the same as those for a senator. 3. The whole 
  number of delegates shall never exceed eighty, nor be less than sixty-five, 
  and shall be apportioned among the several counties according to the 
  population of each, the city of Baltimore to have four more delegates than 
  the most populous county; no county to have less than two delegates, the 
  apportionment to be made after the returns of the national census in 1860 
  are published, and in like manner after each subsequent census. They are to 
  serve two years from the day of their election, which takes place on the 
  same day as that for senators. 
       9.-1. The executive power of the state shall be vested in a governor, 
  whose term of office shall commence on the second Wednesday of January next 
  ensuing his election, and continue for four years, and until his successor 
  shall have qualified. 
      10.-2. The first election for governor under this constitution shall 
  be held on the first Wednesday of November, in the year eighteen hundred and 
  fifty-three, and on the same day and month in every fourth year thereafter, 
  at the places of voting for delegates to the general assembly, and every 
  person qualified to vote for delegates shall be qualified, and entitled to 
  vote for governor; the election to be held in the same manner as the 
  election of delegates, and the returns thereof, under seal, to be addressed 
  to the speaker of the house of delegates, and enclosed and transmitted to 
  the secretary of state, and delivered to the said speaker at the 
  commencement of the session of the legislature next ensuing said election. 
      11.-3. The speaker of the house of delegates shall then open the said 
  returns in the presence of both houses, and the person having the highest 
  number of votes, and being constitutionally eligible, shall be the governor, 
  and shall qualify in the manner herein prescribed, on the second Wednesday 
  of January next ensuing his election, or as soon thereafter as may be 
  practicable. 
      12.-4. If two or more persons shall have the highest and an equal 
  number of votes, one of them shall be chosen governor by the senate and 
  house of delegates; and all questions in relation to the eligibility of 
  governor, and to the returns of said election, and to the number and 
  legality of votes therein given, shall be determined by the house of 
  delegates. And if the person or persons having the highest number of votes 
  be ineligible, the governor shall be chosen by the senate and house of 
  delegates. Every election of governor, by the legislature, shall be 
  determined by a joint majority of the senate and house of delegates, and the 
  vote shall be taken viva voce. But if two or more persons shall have the 
  highest and an equal number of votes, then a second vote shall be taken, 
  which shall be confined to the persons having an equal number; and if the 
  votes should again be equal, then the election of governor shall be 
  determined by lot between those who shall have the highest and an equal 
  number on the first vote. 
      13.-5. The state shall be divided into three districts. St. Mary's, 
  Charles, Calvert, Prince George's, Anne Arundle, Montgomery, and Howard 
  counties, and the city of Baltimore to be the first; the eight counties of 
  the Eastern shore to be the second; and Baltimore, Harford, Frederick, 
  Washington, Allegany, and Carroll counties, to be the third. The governor, 
  elected from the third district in October last, shall continue in office 
  during the term for which he was elected. The governor shall be taken from 
  the first district, at the first election of governor under this 
  constitution; from the second district at the second election, and from the 
  third district at the third election, and in like manner, afterwards, from 
  each district, in regular succession. 
      14.-6. A person to be eligible to the office of governor, must have 
  attained the age of thirty years, and been for five years a citizen of the 
  United States, and for five years next preceding his election a resident of 
  the state, and for three years a resident of the district from which he was 
  elected. 
      15.-7. In case of the death or resignation of the governor, or of his 
  removal from the state, the general assembly, if in session, or if not, at 
  their next session, shall elect some other qualified resident of the same 
  district, to be the governor for the residue of the term for which the said 
  governor had been elected. 
      16.-8. In case of any vacancy in the office of governor during the 
  recess of the legislature, the president of the senate shall discharge the 
  duties of said office till a governor is elected as herein provided for; and 
  in case of the death or resignation of said president, or of his removal 
  from the state, or of his refusal to serve, then the duties of said office 
  shall, in like manner, and for the same interval, devolve upon the speaker 
  of the house of delegates, and the legislature may provide by law for the 
  case of impeachment or inability of the governor, and declare what person 
  shall perform the executive duties during such impeachment or inability; and 
  for any vacancy in said office, not herein provided for, provision may be 
  made by law, and if such vacancy should occur without such provision being 
  made, the legislature shall be convened by the secretary of state for the 
  purpose of filling said vacancy. 
      17.-9. The governor shall be commander-in-chief of the land and naval 
  forces of the state, and may call out the militia to repel invasions, 
  suppress insurrections, and enforce the execution of the laws; but shall not 
  take the command in person without the consent of the legislature. 
      18.-10. He shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed. 
      19.-11. He shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of 
  the senate, appoint all civil and military officers of the state, whose 
  appointment or election is not otherwise herein provided for, unless a 
  different mode of appointment be prescribed by the law creating the office. 
      20.-12. In case of any vacancy during the recess of the senate, in any 
  office which the governor has power to fill, he shall appoint some suitable 
  person to said office, whose commission shall continue in force till the end 
  of the next session of the legislature, or till some other person is 
  appointed to the same office, whichever shall first occur, and the 
  nomination of the person thus appointed during the recess, or of some other 
  person in his place, shall be made to the senate within thirty days after 
  the next meeting of the legislature. 
      21.-13. No person, after being rejected by the senate, shall be again 
  nominated for the same office at the same session, unless at the request of 
  the senate; or be appointed to the same office during the recess of the 
  legislature. 
      22.-14. All civil officers appointed be the governor and senate shall 
  be nominated to the senate within fifty days from the commencement of each 
  regular session of the legislature; and their term of office shall commence 
  on the first Monday of May next ensuing their appointment, and continue for 
  two years (unless sooner removed from office) and until their successors, 
  respectively, qualify according to law. 
      23.-15. The governor may suspend or arrest any military officer of the 
  state for disobedience of orders, or other military offence, and may remove 
  him in pursuance of the sentence of a court-martial; and may remove for 
  incompetency or misconduct, all civil officers, who receive appointments 
  from the executive for a term not succeeding two years. 
      24.-16. The governor may convene the legislature, or the senate alone, 
  on extraordinary occasions; and whenever, from the presence of an enemy or 
  from any other cause, the seat of government shall become an unsafe place 
  for the meeting of the legislature, he may direct their sessions to be held 
  at some other convenient place. 
      25.-17. It shall be the duty of the governor semi-annually, and 
  oftener if he deem it expedient, to examine the bankbook, account books, and 
  official proceedings of the treasurer and comptroller of the state. 
      26.-18. He shall, from time to time, inform the legislature of the 
  condition of the state, and recommend to their consideration such measures 
  as he may judge necessary and expedient. 
      27.-19. He shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons, except in 
  cases of impeachment, and in cases in which he is prohibited by other 
  articles of this constitution, and to remit fines and forfeitures for 
  offences against the state; but shall not remit the principal or interest of 
  any debt due to the state, except in cases of fines and forfeitures; and 
  before granting a nolle prosequi, or pardon, he shall give notice, in one or 
  more newspapers, of the application made for it, and of the day on or after 
  which his decision will be given; and in every case in which he exercises 
  this power, he shall report to either branch of the legislature. Whenever 
  required, the petitions, recommendations and reasons which influence his 
  decision. 
      28.-20. The governor shall reside at the seat of government, and shall 
  receive for his services an annual salary of thirty-six hundred dollars. 
      29.-21. When the public interest requires it, he shall have power to 
  employ counsel, who shall be entitled to such compensation as the 
  legislature may allow in each case after the services of such counsel shall 
  have been performed. 
      29.-22. A secretary of state shall be appointed by the governor, by 
  and with the advice and consent of the senate, who shall continue in office, 
  unless sooner removed by the governor, till the end of the official term of 
  the governor from whom he received his appointment, and shall receive an 
  annual salary of one thousand dollars. 
      30.-23. He shall carefully keep and preserve a record of all official 
  acts an proceedings (which may, at all times, be inspected by a committee of 
  either branch of the legislature,) and shall perform such other duties as 
  may be prescribed by law or as may properly belong to his office. 
      31.-3d. The judicial power of this state shall be vested in a court of 
  appeals, in circuit courts, in such courts for the city of Baltimore as may 
  be hereinafter prescribed, and in justices of the peace. 
      32.-2. The court of appeals shall have appellate jurisdiction only, 
  which shall be co-extensive with the limits of the state. It shall consist 
  of a chief justice and three associate justices, any three of whom shall 
  form a quorum, whose judgment shall be final and conclusive in all cases of 
  appeals; and who shall have the jurisdiction which the present court of 
  appeals of this state now has, and such other appellate jurisdiction as 
  hereafter may be provided for by law. And in every case decided, an opinion, 
  in writing, shall be filed, and provision shall be made, by law, for 
  publishing reports of cases argued and determined in the said court. The 
  governor, for the time being, by and with the advice and consent of the 
  senate, shall designate the chief justice, and the court of appeals shall 
  hold its sessions at the city of Annapolis, on the first Monday of June, and 
  the first Monday of December, in each and every year. 
      33.-3. The state shall be divided into four judicial districts: 
  Allegany, Washington, Frederick, Carroll, Baltimore, and Harford counties, 
  shall compose the first; Montgomery, Howard, Anne Arundel, Calvert, St. 
  Mary's, Charles and Prince George's, the second; Baltimore city, the third; 
  and Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's, Talbot, Caroline, Dorchester, Somerset, and 
  Worcester, shall compose the fourth district. And one person from among 
  those learned in the law having been admitted to practice in this this state 
  at least, five years, and above the age of thirty years at the time of his 
  election, and a resident of the judicial district, shall be elected from 
  each of said districts by the legal and qualified voters therein, as a judge 
  of the said court of appeals, who shall hold his office for the term of ten 
  years from the time of his election, or until he shall have attained the age 
  of seventy years, whichever may first happen, and be reeligible thereto 
  until he shall have attained the age of seventy years, and not after, 
  subject to removal for incompetency, willful neglect of duty, or misbehaviour
  
  in office, on conviction in a court of law, or by the governor upon the 
  address of the general assembly, two-thirds of the members of each house 
  concurring in such address; and the salary of each of the judges of the 
  court of appeals shall be two thousand five hundred dollars annually, and 
  shall not be increased or diminished during their continuance in office; and 
  no fees or perquisites of any kind, shall be allowed by law to any of the 
  said judges. 
      34.-4. No judge of the court of appeals shall sit in any case wherein 
  he may be interested, or where either of the parties may be connected with 
  him by affinity or consanguinity within such degrees as may be prescribed by 
  law, or when he shall have been of counsel in said case; when the court of 
  appeals, or any of its members shall be thus disqualified to bear and 
  determine any case or cases in said court, so that by reason thereof no 
  judgment can be rendered in said court, the same shall be certified to the 
  governor of the state, who shall immediately commission the requisite number 
  of persons learned in the law for the trial and determination of said case 
  or cases. 
      35.-5. All judges of the court of appeals, of the circuit courts, and 
  of the courts for the city of Baltimore, shall, by virtue of their offices, 
  be conservator's of the peace throughout the state. 
      36.-6. All public commissions and grants shall run thus: "The State of 
  Maryland," &c., and shall be signed by the governor, with the seal of the 
  state annexed; all writs and process shall run in the same style, and be 
  tested, sealed and signed as usual; and all indictments shall conclude 
  "against the peace, government and dignity of the state." 
      37.-7. The state shall be divided into eight judicial circuits, in 
  manner and form following, to wit; St. Mary's, Charles, and Prince George's 
  counties shall be the first: Anne, Arundel, Howard, Calvert and Montgomery 
  counties shall be the second; Frederick and Carroll counties shall be the 
  third; Washington and Allegany counties shall be the fourth; Baltimore city 
  shall be the fifth; Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties shall be the 
  sixth; Kent, Queen Anne's, Talbot and Caroline counties shall be the 
  seventh; and Dorchester, Somerset and Worcester counties shall be the 
  eighth; and there shall be elected, as hereinafter directed, for each of the 
  said judicial circuits, except the fifth, one person from among those 
  learned in the law, having been admitted to practice in this state, and who 
  shall have been a citizen of this state at least five years, and above the 
  age of thirty years at the time of his election, and a resident of the 
  judicial circuit, to be judge thereof; the said judges shall be styled 
  circuit judges, and shall respectively hold a term of their courts at least 
  twice in each year, or oftener if required by law, in each county composing 
  their respective circuits; and the said courts shall be called circuit 
  courts for the county in which they may be held, and shall have and exercise 
  in the several counties of this state, all the power, authority and 
  jurisdiction which the county courts of this state now have and exercise, or 
  which may hereafter be prescribed by law, and the said judges in their 
  respective circuits, shall have and exercise all the power, authority and 
  jurisdiction of the present court of chancery of Maryland; provided, 
  nevertheless, that Baltimore county court may hold its sittings within the 
  limits of the city of Baltimore, until provision shall be made by law for 
  the location of a county seat within the limits of the said county proper, 
  and the erection of a court house and all other appropriate buildings, for 
  the convenient administration of justice in said court. 
      38.-8. The judges of the several judicial circuits shall be citizens 
  of the United States, and shall have resided five years in this state, and 
  two years in the judicial circuit for which they may be respectively 
  elected, next before the time of their election, and shall reside therein 
  while they continue to act as judges; they shall be taken from among those 
  who, having the other qualifications herein prescribed, are most 
  distinguished for integrity, wisdom and sound legal knowledge, and shall be 
  elected by the qualified voters of the said circuits, and shall hold their 
  offices for the term of ten years, removable for misbehaviour, on conviction 
  in a court of law or by the governor, upon the address of the general 
  assembly, provided that two-thirds of the members of each house shall concur 
  in such address, and the said judges shall each receive a salary of two 
  thousand dollars a year, and the same shall not be increased or diminished 
  during the time of their continuance in office; and no judge of any court in 
  this state, shall receive any perquisite, fee, commission or reward, in 
  addition thereto, for the performance of any judicial duty. 
      39.-9. There shall be established for the city of Baltimore one court 
  of law, to be styled "the court of common pleas," which shall have civil 
  jurisdiction in all suits where the debt or damage claimed shall be over one 
  hundred dollars, and shall not exceed five hundred dollars; and shall, also, 
  have jurisdiction in all cases of appeal from the judgment of justices of 
  the peace in the said city, and shall have jurisdiction in all applications 
  for the benefit of the insolvent laws of this state, and the supervision and 
  control of the trustees thereof. 
      40.-10. There shall also be established, for the city of Baltimore, 
  another court of law, to be styled the superior court of Baltimore city, 
  which shall have jurisdiction over all suits where the debt or damage 
  claimed shall exceed the sum of five hundred dollars, and in case any 
  plaintiff or plaintiffs shall recover less than the sum or value of five 
  hundred dollars, he or they shall be allowed or adjudged to pay costs in the 
  discretion of the court. The said court shall also have jurisdiction as a 
  court of equity within the limits of the said city, and in all other civil 
  cases which have not been heretofore assigned to the court of common pleas. 
      41.-11. Each of the said two courts shall consist of one judge, who 
  shall be elected by the legal and qualified voters of the said city, and 
  shall bold his office for the term of ten years, subject to the provisions 
  of this constitution, with regard to the election and qualification of 
  judges and their removal from office, and the salary of each of the said 
  judges shall be twenty-five hundred dollars a year; and the legislature 
  shall, wherever it may think the same proper and expedient, provide, by law, 
  another court for the city of Baltimore, to consist of one judge to be 
  elected by the qualified voters of the said city, who shall be subject to 
  the same constitutional provisions, hold his office for the same term of 
  years, and receive the same compensation as the judge of the court of common 
  pleas of the said city, and the said court shall have such jurisdiction and 
  powers as may be prescribed by law. 
      42.-12. There shall also be a criminal court for the city of 
  Baltimore, to be styled the criminal court of Baltimore, which shall consist 
  of one judge, who shall also be elected by the legal and qualified voters of 
  the said city, and who shall have and exercise all the jurisdiction now 
  exercised by Baltimore city court, and the said judge shall receive a salary 
  of two thousand dollars a year, and shall be subject, to the provisions of 
  this constitution with regard to the election and qualifications of judges, 
  term of office, and removal therefrom. 
      43.-13. The qualified voters of the city of Baltimore, and of the 
  several counties of the state, shall, on the first, Wednesday of November, 
  eighteen hundred and fifty-one, and on the same day of the same month in, 
  every fourth year forever thereafter, elect three men to be judges of the 
  orphans' court of said city and counties respectively, who shall be citizens 
  of the state of Maryland, and citizens of the city or county for which they 
  may be severally elected at the time of their election. They shall have all 
  the powers now vested in the orphans' courts of this state, subject to such 
  changes therein as the legislature may prescribe, and each of said judges 
  shall be paid at a per diem rate, for the time they are in session, to be 
  fixed by the legislature, and paid by the said counties and city 
  respectively. 
      44.-14. The legislature, at its first session after the adoption of 
  this constitution, shall fix the number of justices of the peace and 
  constables for each ward of the city of Baltimore, and for each election 
  district in the several counties, who shall be elected by the legal and 
  qualified voters thereof respectively, at the next general election for 
  delegates thereafter, and shall hold their offices for two years from the 
  time of their election, and until their successors in office are elected and 
  qualified; and the legislature may, from time to time, increase or diminish 
  the number of justices of the peace and constables to be elected in the 
  several wards and election districts, as the wants and interests of the 
  people may require. They shall be, by virtue of their offices, conservators 
  of the peace in the said counties and city respectively, and shall have such 
  duties and compensation as now exist, or may be provided for by law. In the 
  event of a vacancy in the office of a justice of the peace, the governor 
  shall appoint a person to serve as justice of the peace, until the next 
  regular election of said officers, and in case of a vacancy in the office of 
  constable, the county commissioners of the county, in which a vacancy may 
  occur, or the mayor and city council of Baltimore, as the case may be, shall 
  appoint a person to serve as constable until the next regular election 
  thereafter for said officers. An appeal shall lie in all civil cases from 
  the judgment of a justice of the peace to the circuit court, or, to the 
  court of common pleas of Baltimore city, as the case way be, and on all such 
  appeals, either party shall be entitled to a trial by jury, according to the 
  laws now existing, or which way be hereafter enacted. And the mayor and city 
  council may provide, by ordinance, from time to time, for the creation and 
  government of such temporary additional police, as they may deem necessary 
  to preserve the public peace. 
      45.-15. No judge shall sit in any case wherein he may be interested, 
  or where either of the parties may be connected with him by affinity or 
  consanguinity, within such degrees as may be prescribed by law, or where he 
  shall have been of counsel in the case and whenever any of the judges of the 
  circuit courts, or of the courts for Baltimore city, shall be thus 
  disqualified, or whenever, by reason of sickness, or any other cause, the 
  said judges, or any of them, may be unable to sit in any cause, the parties 
  may, by consent, appoint a proper person to try the said cause, or the 
  judges, or any of them, shall do so when directed by law. 
      46.-16. The present chancellor and the register in chancery, and, in 
  the event of any vacancy in their respective offices, their successors in 
  office respectively, who are to be appointed as at present, by the governor 
  and senate, shall continue in office, with the powers and compensation as at 
  present established, until the expiration of two years after the adoption of 
  this constitution by the people, and until the, end of the session of the 
  legislature next thereafter, after which the said offices of chancellor and 
  register shall be abolished. The legislature shall, in the mean time, 
  provide by law for the recording, safe-keeping, or other disposition, of the 
  records, decrees and other proceedings of the court of chancery, and for the 
  copying and attestation thereof, and for the custody and use of the great 
  seal of the state, when required, after the expiration of the said two 
  years, and for transmitting to the said counties, and to the city of 
  Baltimore, all the cases and proceedings in said court then undisposed of 
  and unfinished, in such manner, and under such regulations as may be deemed 
  necessary and proper: Provided, that no new business shall originate in the 
  said court, nor shall any cause be removed to the same from any other court, 
  from and after the ratification of this constitution. 
      47.-17. The first election of judges, clerks, registers of wills, and 
  all other officers, whose election by the people is provided for in this 
  article of the constitution, except justices of the peace and constables, 
  shall take place throughout the state on the first Wednesday of November 
  next after the ratification of this constitution by the people. 
      48.-18. In case of the death, resignation, removal, or other 
  disqualification of a judge of any of the courts of law, the governor, by 
  and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall thereupon appoint a 
  person, duly qualified, to fill said office until the next general election 
  for delegates thereafter; at which time an election shall be held as 
  hereinbefore prescribed, for a judge, who shall hold the said office for ten 
  years, according to the provisions of this constitution. 
      49.-19. In case of the death, resignation, removal, or other 
  disqualification of the judge of an orphans' court, the vacancy shall be 
  filled by the appointment of the governor, by and with the advice and 
  consent of the senate. 
      50.-20. Whenever lands lie partly in one county, and partly in another 
  or partly in a county and partly in the city of Baltimore, or whenever 
  persons proper to be made defendants to proceedings in chancery, reside some 
  in one county and some in another, that court shall have jurisdiction in 
  which proceedings shall have been first commenced, subject to such rules, 
  regulations and alterations as may be prescribed by law. 
      51.-21. In all suits or actions at law, issues from the orphans' court 
  or from any court sitting in equity, in petitions for freedom, and in all 
  presentments and indictments now pending, or which may be pending at the 
  time of the adoption of this constitution by the people, or which may 
  hereafter be instituted in any of the courts of law of this state, having 
  jurisdiction thereof, the judge or judges thereof, upon suggestion in 
  writing, if made by the state's attorney, or the prosecutor for the state, 
  or upon suggestion in writing, supported by affidavit, made by any of the 
  parties thereto, or other proper evidence, that a fair and impartial trial 
  cannot be had in the court where such suit or action at law, issues or 
  petitions, or presentment and indictment is depending, shall order and 
  direct the record of proceedings in such suit or action, issues or 
  petitions, presentment or indictment, to be transmitted to the court of any 
  adjoining county; provided, that the removal in all civil causes be confined 
  to an adjoining county within the judicial circuit, except as to the city of 
  Baltimore, where the removal may be to an adjoining county, for trial, which 
  court shall hear and determine the same in like manner as if such suit or 
  action, issues or petitions, presentment or indictment, had been originally 
  instituted therein; and provided also, that such suggestion shall be made as 
  aforesaid, before or during the term in which the issue or issues may be 
  joined in said suit or action, issues or petition, presentment or 
  indictment, and that such further remedy in the premises may be provided by 
  law, as the legislature shall from time to time direct and enact. 
      52.-22. All election of judges, and other officers provided for by 
  this constitution, shall be certified, and the returns made by the clerks of 
  the respective counties to the governor, who shall issue commissions to the 
  different persons for the offices to which they shall have been respectively 
  elected; and in all such elections, the person having the greatest number of 
  votes, shall be declared to be elected. 
      53.-23. If, in any case of election for judges, clerks of the courts 
  of law and registers of wills, the opposing candidates shall have an equal 
  number of votes, it shall be the duty of the governor to order a new 
  election; and in case of any contested election, the governor shall send the 
  returns to the house of delegates, who shall judge of the election and 
  qualification of the candidates at such election. 
  
  

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