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7 definitions found
 for Money
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Money \Mon"ey\, v. t.
     To supply with money. [Obs.]
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Money \Mon"ey\, n.; pl. Moneys. [OE. moneie, OF. moneie, F.
     monnaie, fr. L. moneta. See Mint place where coin is made,
     Mind, and cf. Moidore, Monetary.]
     1. A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined,
        or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a
        medium of exchange in financial transactions between
        citizens and with government; also, any number of such
        pieces; coin.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              To prevent such abuses, . . . it has been found
              necessary . . . to affix a public stamp upon certain
              quantities of such particular metals, as were in
              those countries commonly made use of to purchase
              goods. Hence the origin of coined money, and of
              those public offices called mints.    --A. Smith.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as
        a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit,
        etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is
        lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense,
        any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and
        selling.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Any article used as a medium of payment in financial
        transactions, such as checks drawn on checking accounts.
        [PJC]
  
     4. (Economics) Any form of wealth which affects a person's
        propensity to spend, such as checking accounts or time
        deposits in banks, credit accounts, letters of credit,
        etc. Various aggregates of money in different forms are
        given different names, such as M-1, the total sum of all
        currency in circulation plus all money in demand deposit
        accounts (checking accounts).
        [PJC]
  
     Note: Whatever, among barbarous nations, is used as a medium
           of effecting exchanges of property, and in the terms of
           which values are reckoned, as sheep, wampum, copper
           rings, quills of salt or of gold dust, shovel blades,
           etc., is, in common language, called their money.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     4. In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in
        land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.
                                                    --1 Tim vi. 10
                                                    (Rev. Ver. ).
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Money bill (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue.
  
     Money broker, a broker who deals in different kinds of
        money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called
        also money changer.
  
     Money cowrie (Zool.), any one of several species of
        Cypraea (esp. Cypraea moneta) formerly much used as
        money by savage tribes. See Cowrie.
  
     Money of account, a denomination of value used in keeping
        accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an
        equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in
        the United States, but not a coin.
  
     Money order,
        (a) an order for the payment of money; specifically, a
            government order for the payment of money, issued at
            one post office as payable at another; -- called also
            postal money order.
        (b) a similar order issued by a bank or other financial
            institution.
  
     Money scrivener, a person who procures the loan of money to
        others. [Eng.]
  
     Money spider, Money spinner (Zool.), a small spider; --
        so called as being popularly supposed to indicate that the
        person upon whom it crawls will be fortunate in money
        matters.
  
     Money's worth, a fair or full equivalent for the money
        which is paid.
  
     A piece of money, a single coin.
  
     Ready money, money held ready for payment, or actually
        paid, at the time of a transaction; cash.
  
     plastic money, credit cards, usually made out of plastic;
        also called plastic; as, put it on the plastic.
  
     To make money, to gain or acquire money or property; to
        make a profit in dealings.
        [1913 Webster +PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  money
      n 1: the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal
           tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"
      2: wealth reckoned in terms of money; "all his money is in real
         estate"
      3: the official currency issued by a government or national
         bank; "he changed his money into francs"

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  140 Moby Thesaurus words for "money":
     Swiss bank account, affluence, affluent, assets, balance,
     bank account, banknotes, bankroll, bills, blunt, boodle,
     bottom dollar, bottomless purse, brass, bread, bucks, budget,
     bulging purse, bundle, cabbage, capital, cash, cash reserves,
     change, checking account, chink, chips, coin, coinage, coins,
     command of money, currency, dinero, do-re-mi, dough,
     easy circumstances, embarras de richesses, exchequer, fat,
     filthy lucre, finances, flush, folding money, fortune, fund, funds,
     gain, gelt, gold, greenbacks, handsome fortune, hard cash, hay,
     high income, high tax bracket, in clover, in the money,
     independence, jack, kale, kitty, legal tender, lettuce,
     life savings, liquid assets, loaded, lolly, loot, lucre,
     luxuriousness, mammon, material wealth, mazuma, means,
     medium of exchange, money to burn, moneybags, moneyed, moneys,
     monied, moolah, mopus, needful, nest egg, net, notes,
     on Easy Street, ooftish, opulence, opulency, paper money,
     pecuniary resources, pelf, percentage, pocket, pool, possessions,
     profit, property, prosperity, prosperous, prosperousness, purse,
     rake-off, ready money, reserves, resources, rhino, rich, riches,
     richness, rocks, savings, savings account, scratch, shekels,
     simoleons, six-figure income, small change, smash, specie, spinach,
     stiff, stuff, stumpy, substance, sugar, swag, take, the ready,
     treasure, unregistered bank account, upper bracket, wampum, wealth,
     wealthiness, wealthy, well-heeled, well-to-do, wherewithal
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Money
     Of uncoined money the first notice we have is in the history of
     Abraham (Gen. 13:2; 20:16; 24:35). Next, this word is used in
     connection with the purchase of the cave of Machpelah (23:16),
     and again in connection with Jacob's purchase of a field at
     Shalem (Gen. 33:18, 19) for "an hundred pieces of money"=an
     hundred Hebrew kesitahs (q.v.), i.e., probably pieces of money,
     as is supposed, bearing the figure of a lamb.
     
       The history of Joseph affords evidence of the constant use of
     money, silver of a fixed weight. This appears also in all the
     subsequent history of the Jewish people, in all their internal
     as well as foreign transactions. There were in common use in
     trade silver pieces of a definite weight, shekels, half-shekels,
     and quarter-shekels. But these were not properly coins, which
     are pieces of metal authoritatively issued, and bearing a stamp.
     
       Of the use of coined money we have no early notice among the
     Hebrews. The first mentioned is of Persian coinage, the daric
     (Ezra 2:69; Neh. 7:70) and the 'adarkon (Ezra 8:27). The daric
     (q.v.) was a gold piece current in Palestine in the time of
     Cyrus. As long as the Jews, after the Exile, lived under Persian
     rule, they used Persian coins. These gave place to Greek coins
     when Palestine came under the dominion of the Greeks (B.C. 331),
     the coins consisting of gold, silver, and copper pieces. The
     usual gold pieces were staters (q.v.), and the silver coins
     tetradrachms and drachms.
     
       In the year B.C. 140, Antiochus VII. gave permission to Simon
     the Maccabee to coin Jewish money. Shekels (q.v.) were then
     coined bearing the figure of the almond rod and the pot of
     manna.
     

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MONEY. Gold, silver, and some other less precious metals, in the progress of 
  civilization and commerce, have become the common standards of value; in 
  order to avoid the delay and inconvenience of regulating their weight and 
  quality whenever passed, the governments of the civilized world have caused 
  them to be manufactured in certain portions, and marked with a Stamp which 
  attests their value; this is called money. 1 Inst. 207; 1 Hale's Hist. 188; 
  1 Pardess. n. 22; Dom. Lois civ. liv. prel. t. 3, s. 2, n. 6. 
       2. For many purposes, bank notes; (q.v.) 1 Y. & J, 380; 3 Mass. 405; 
  14 Mass. 122; 2 N. H. Rep. 333; 17 Mass. 560; 7 Cowen, 662; 4 Pick. 74; 
  Bravt. 24; a check; 4 Bing. 179; S. C. 13 E. C. L. R. 295; and negotiable 
  notes; 3 Mass. 405; will be so considered. To support a count for money had 
  and received, the receipt by the defendant of bank notes, promissory notes: 
  3 Mass. 405; 3 Shepl. 285; 9 Pick. 93; John. 132; credit in account, in the 
  books of a third person; 3 Campb. 199; or any chattel, is sufficient; 4 
  Pick. 71; 17 Mass. 560; and will be treated as money. See 7 Wend. 311; 8 
  Wend. 641; 7 S. & R. 246; 8 T. R. 687; 3 B. & P. 559; 1 Y. & J. 380. 
       3. The constitution of the United States has vested in congress the 
  power "to coin money, and regulate the value thereof." Art. 1, s. 8. 
       4. By virtue of this constitutional authority, the following provisions 
  have been enacted by congress. 
       1. Act of April 2, 1792, 1 Story's L. U. S. 229. 
       1. Sec. 9. That there shall be from time to time, struck and coined at 
  the said mint, coins of gold, silver, and copper, of the following 
  denominations, values, and descriptions, viz: Eagles; each to be of the 
  value of ten dollars, or units, and to contain two hundred and forty-seven 
  grains and four-eighths of a grain of pure, or two hundred and seventy 
  grains of standard, gold. Half eagles; each to be of the value of five 
  dollars, and to contain one hundred and twenty-three grains and six-eighths 
  of a pure, or one hundred and thirty-five grains of standard gold. Quarter 
  eagles; each to be of the value of two dollars and a half dollar, and to 
  contain sixty-one grains and seven-eighths of a grain of pure, or sixty-
  seven grains and four-eighths of a grain of standard gold. Dollars, or 
  units; each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar, as the same is 
  now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four-
  sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of 
  standard silver. Half dollars; each to be of half the value of the dollar or 
  unit, and to contain one hundred and eighty-five grains and ten-sixteenth 
  parts of a grain of pure, or two hundred and eight grains of standard, 
  silver. Quarter dollars; each to be of one-fourth the value of the dollar, 
  or unit, and to contain ninety-two grains and thirteen-sixteenth parts of a 
  grain of pure, or one hundred and four grains of standard, silver. Dimes; 
  each to be of the value of one-tenth of a dollar, or unit, and to contain 
  thirty-seven grains and two sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or forty-one 
  grains and three-fifth parts of a grain of standard, silver. Half dimes; 
  each to be of the value of one-twentieth of dollar, and to contain eighteen 
  grains and nine-sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or twenty grains and 
  four-fifth parts of a grain of standard, silver. Cents; each to be of the 
  value of the one-hundredth part of a dollar, and to contain eleven 
  pennyweights of copper. Half cents; each to be of the value of half a cent, 
  and to contain five pennyweights and, a half a pennyweight of copper. 
       5.-Sec. 10. That upon the said coins, respectively, there shall be 
  the following devises and legends, namely: Upon one side of each of the said 
  coins there shall be an impression emblematic of liberty, with an 
  inscription of the word liberty, and the year of the coinage; and, upon the 
  reverse of each of the gold and silver coins, there shall be the figure or 
  representation of an eagle, with this inscription, "United States of 
  America:" and, upon the reverse of each of the copper coins there shall be 
  an inscription which shall express the denomination of the piece, namely, 
  cent or half cent, as the case may require. 
       6.-Sec. 11. That the proportional value of gold to silver in all 
  coins which shall, by law, be current as money within the United States, 
  shall be as fifteen to one, according to quantity in weight, of pure gold or 
  pure silver; that is to say, every fifteen pounds weight of pure silver 
  shall be of equal value in all payments, with one pound weight of pure gold; 
  and so in proportion, as to any greater or less quantities of the respective 
  metals. 
       7.-Sec. 12. That the standard for all gold coins of the United 
  States, shall be eleven parts fine to one part alloy: and accordingly, that 
  eleven parts in twelve, of the entire weight of each of the said coins, 
  shall consist of pure gold, and the remaining one-twelfth part of alloy; and 
  the said alloy shall be composed of silver and copper in such proportions, 
  not exceeding one-half silver, as shall be found convenient; to be regulated 
  by the director of the mint for the time being, With the approbation of the 
  president of the United States, until further provision shall be made by 
  law. And to the end that the necessary information may be had in order to 
  the making of such further provision, it shall be the duty of the director 
  of the mint, at the expiration of a year after commencing the operations of 
  the said mint, to report to congress the practice thereof during the said 
  year, touching the composition of the alloy of the said gold coins, the 
  reasons for such practice, and the experiments and observations which shall 
  have been made concerning the effects of different proportions of silver and 
  copper in the said alloy. 
       8.- Sec. 13. That the standard for all silver coins of the United 
  States, shall be one thousand four hundred and eighty-five parts fine to one 
  hundred and seventy-nine parts alloy; and, accordingly, that one thousand 
  four hundred and eighty-five parts in one thousand six hundred and sixty-
  four parts, of the entire weight of each of the said coins, shall consist of 
  pure silver, and the remaining one hundred and seventy nine parts of alloy, 
  which alloy shall be wholly of copper. 
       9.-2. Act of June 28, 1834, 4 Sharsw. cont. of Story's Laws U. S. 
  2376.  
       Sec. 1. That the gold coins of the United States shall contain the 
  following quantities of metal, that is to say: each eagle shall contain two 
  hundred and thirty-two grains of pure gold, and two hundred and fifty-eight 
  grains of standard gold; each half-eagle, one hundred and sixteen grains of 
  pure gold, and one hundred and twenty-nine grains of standard gold; each 
  quarter eagle shall contain fifty-eight grains of pure gold, and sixty-four 
  and a half grains of standard gold; every such eagle shall be of the value 
  of ten dollars; every such half eagle shall be of the value of five dollars; 
  and every such quarter eagle shall be of the value of two dollars and fifty 
  cents; and the said gold coins shall be receivable in all payments, when of 
  full weight, according to their respective values; and when of less than 
  full weight, at less values, proportioned to their respective actual 
  weights. 
      10.-Sec. 2. That all standard gold or silver deposited for coinage 
  after the thirty-first of July next, shall be paid for in coin under the 
  direction of the secretary of the treasury, within five days from the making 
  of such deposit, deducting from the amount of said deposit of gold and 
  silver, one-half of one per centum: Provided, That no deduction shall be 
  made unless said advance be required by such depositor within forty days. 
      11.-Sec. 3. That all gold coins of the United States, minted anterior 
  to the thirty-first day of July next, shall be receivable in all payments at 
  the rate of ninety-four and eight-tenths of a cent per pennyweight. 
      12.-3. Act of January 18, 1837, 4 Sharsw. cont. of Story's Laws U. S. 
  2524. 
       Sec. 9. That of the silver coins, the dollar shall be of the weight of 
  four hundred and twelve and one-half grains; the half dollar of the weight 
  of two hundred and six and one-fourth grains; the quarter dollar of the 
  weight of one hundred and three and one-eighth grains; the dime, or tenth 
  part of a dollar, of the weight of forty-one and a quarter grains; and the 
  half dime, or twentieth part of a dollar, of the weight of twenty grains, 
  and five-eighths of a grain. And that dollars, half dollars, and quarter 
  dollars, dimes and half dimes, shall be legal tenders of payment, according 
  to their nominal value, for any sums whatever. 
      13.-Sec. 10. That of the gold coins, the weight of the eagle shall be 
  two hundred and fifty-eight grains; that of the half eagle, one hundred and 
  twenty-nine grains; and that of the quarter eagle, sixty-four and one-half 
  grain;. And that for all sums whatever, the eagle shall be a legal tender of 
  payment for ten dollars; the half eagle for five dollars and the quarter 
  eagle for two and a half dollars. 
      14.- Sec. 11. That the silver coins heretofore issued at the mint of the 
  United States, and the gold coins issued since the thirty-first day of July, 
  one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four, shall continue to be legal 
  tenders of payment for their nominal values, on the same terms as if they 
  were of the coinage provided for by this act. 
      15.-Sec. 12. That of the copper coins, the weight of the cent shall be 
  one hundred and sixty-eight grains, and the weight of the half cent eighty 
  four grains. And the cent shall be considered of the value of one hundredth 
  part of a dollar, and the half cent of the value of one two-hundredth part 
  of a dollar. 
      16.-Sec. 13. That upon the coins struck at the mint, there shall be 
  the following devices and legends; upon one side of each of said coins, 
  there shall be an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscription of 
  the word LIBERTY, and the year of the coinage; and upon the reverse of each 
  of the gold and silver coins, there shall be the figure or representation of 
  an eagle, with the inscription United States of America, and a designation 
  of the value of the coin; but on the reverse of the dime and half dime, cent 
  and half cent, the figure of the eagle shall be omitted. 
      17.-Sec. 38. That all acts or parts of acts heretofore passed, 
  relating to the mint and coins of the United States, which are inconsistent 
  with the provisions of this act, be, and the same are hereby repealed. 
      18.-4. Act of March 3, 1825, 3 Story's L. U. S. 2005. 
      Sec. 20. That, if any person or persons shall falsely make, forge, or 
  counterfeit, or cause or procure to be falsely made, forged, or 
  counterfeited, or willingly aid or assist in falsely making, forging, or 
  counterfeiting any coin, in the resemblance or similitude of the gold or 
  silver coin, which has been, or hereafter may be, coined at the mint of the 
  United States; or in the resemblance or similitude of any foreign gold or 
  silver coin which by law now is, or hereafter may be made current in the 
  United States; or shall pass, utter, publish, or sell, or attempt to pass, 
  utter, publish, or sell, or bring into the United States, from any foreign 
  place, with intent to pass, utter, publish, or sell, as true, any such 
  false, forged, or counterfeited coin, knowing the same to be false, forged, 
  or counterfeited, with intent to defraud any body politic, or corporate, or 
  any other person or persons, whatsoever; every person, so offending, shall 
  be deemed guilty of felony, and shall, on conviction thereof, be punished by 
  fine, not exceeding five thousand dollars, and by imprisonment, and 
  confinement to hard labor, not exceeding ten years, according to the, 
  aggravation of the offence. 
      19.-Sec. 21. That, if any person or persons shall falsely make, forge, 
  or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be falsely made, forged or 
  counterfeited, or willingly aid or assist in falsely making, forging or 
  counterfeiting any coin, in the resemblance or similitude of any copper 
  coin, which has been, or hereafter may be, coined at the mint of the United 
  States; or shall pass, utter, publish, or sell, or attempt to pass, utter, 
  publish or sell, or bring into the United States, from any foreign place, 
  with intent to pass, utter, publish, or sell as true, any such false, 
  forged, or counterfeited coin, with intent to defraud any body politic, or 
  corporate, or any other person or persons whatsoever; every person so 
  offending, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall, on conviction 
  thereof, be punished by fine, not exceeding one thousand dollars, and by 
  imprisonment, and confinement, to hard labor, not exceeding three years. See 
  generally, 1 J. J. Marsh. 202; 1 Bibb, 330; 2 Wash. 282; 3 Call, 557; 5 S. & 
  R. 48; 1 Dall. 124; 2 Dana, 298; 3 Conn. 534; 4 Harr. & McHen. 199. 
      20.-5. Act of March 3, 1849, Minot's Statutes at Large of U. S. 397. 
      21.-Sec. 1. That there shall be, from time to time, struck and coined 
  at the mint of the United States, and the branches thereof, conformably in 
  all respects to law, (except that on the reverse of the gold dollar the 
  figure of the eagle shall be omitted), and conformably in all respects to 
  the standard for gold coins now established by law, coins of gold of the 
  following denominations and values, viz.: double eagles, each to be of the 
  value of twenty dollars, or units, and gold dollars, each to be of the value 
  of one dollar, or unit. 
      22.-Sec. 2. That, for all sums whatever, the double eagle shall be a 
  legal tender for twenty dollars, and the gold dollar shall be a legal tender 
  for one dollar. 
      23.-Sec. 3. That all laws now in force in relation to the coins of the 
  United States, and the striking and coining the same, shall, so far as 
  applicable, have full force and effect in relation to the coins herein 
  authorized, whether, the said laws are penal or otherwise; and whether they 
  are for preventing counterfeiting or debasement, for protecting the 
  currency, for regulating and guarding the process of striking and coining, 
  and the preparations therefor, or for the security of the coin, or for any 
  other purpose. 
      24.-Sec. 4. That, in adjusting the weights of gold coins henceforward, 
  the following deviations from the standard weight shall not be exceeded in 
  any of the single pieces; namely, in the double eagle, the eagle, and the 
  half eagle, one half of a grain, and in the quarter eagle, and gold dollar, 
  one quarter of a grain; and that, in weighing a large number of pieces 
  together, when delivered from the chief coiner to the treasurer, and from 
  the treasurer to the depositors, the deviation from the standard weight 
  shall not exceed three pennyweights in one thousand double eagles; two 
  pennyweights in one thousand, eagles; one and one half pennyweights in one 
  thousand half eagle;; one pennyweight in one thousand quarter eagles; and 
  one half of a pennyweight in one thousand gold dollars. 
      25.-6. Act of March 3, 1851. Minot's Statutes at Large, U. S. 591. 
      26.-Sec. 11. That from and after the passage of this act, it shall be 
  lawful to coin at the mint of the United States and its branches, a piece of 
  the denomination and legal value of three cents, or three hundredths of a 
  dollar, to be composed of three-fourths silver and one-fourth copper and to 
  weigh twelve grains and three eighths of a grain; that the said coin shall 
  bear such devices as shall be conspicuously different from those of the 
  other silver coins, and of the gold dollar, but having the inscription 
  United States of America, and its denomination and date; and that it shall 
  be a legal tender in payment of debts for all sums of thirty cents and 
  under. And that no ingots shall be used for the coinage of the three cent 
  pieces herein authorized, of which the quality differs more than five 
  thousandths from the legal standard; and that in adjusting the weight of the 
  said coin, the following deviations from the standard weight shall not be 
  exceeded, namely, one half of a grain in the single piece, and one 
  pennyweight in a thousand pieces. 
  
  

From The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906) :

  MONEY, n.  A blessing that is of no advantage to us excepting when we
  part with it.  An evidence of culture and a passport to polite
  society.  Supportable property.
  

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