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5 definitions found
 for NIS
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Nis \Nis\ [From ne is.]
     Is not. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
     [1913 Webster]

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014) :

  NIS
         Network Information Service (NSF)
         

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014) :

  NIS
         Network Information System (Unix)
         

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  Network Information Service
  NIS
  Yellow Pages
  
      (NIS) Sun Microsystems' Yellow Pages
     (yp) client-server protocol for distributing system
     configuration data such as user and host names between
     computers on a network.
  
     Sun licenses the technology to virtually all other Unix
     vendors.
  
     The name "Yellow Pages" is a registered trademark in the
     United Kingdom of British Telecommunications plc for their
     (paper) commercial telephone directory.  Sun changed the name
     of their system to NIS, though all the commands and functions
     still start with "yp", e.g. ypcat, ypmatch, ypwhich.
  
     Unix manual pages: yp(3), ypclnt(3), ypcat(1), ypmatch(1).
  
     (1995-04-08)
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  NISI. This word is frequently used in legal proceedings to denote that 
  something has been done, which is to be valid unless something else Shall be 
  done within a certain time to defeat it. For example, an order may be made 
  that if on the day appointed to show cause, none be shown, an injunction 
  will be dissolved of course, on motion, and production of an affidavit of 
  service of the order. This is called an order nisi. Ch. Pr. 547. Under the 
  compulsory arbitration law of Pennsylvania, on the filing of the award, 
  judgment nisi is to be entered: which judgment is to be as valid as if it 
  had been rendered on the verdict of a jury, unless an appeal be entered 
  within the time required by the law. 
  
  

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