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2 definitions found
 for Potential cautery
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Potential \Po*ten"tial\, a. [Cf. F. potentiel. See Potency.]
     1. Being potent; endowed with energy adequate to a result;
        efficacious; influential. [Obs.] "And hath in his effect a
        voice potential." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Existing in possibility, not in actuality. "A potential
        hero." --Carlyle.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Potential existence means merely that the thing may
              be at ome time; actual existence, that it now is.
                                                    --Sir W.
                                                    Hamilton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Potential cautery. See under Cautery.
  
     Potential energy. (Mech.) See the Note under Energy.
  
     Potential mood, or Potential mode (Gram.), that form of
        the verb which is used to express possibility, liberty,
        power, will, obligation, or necessity, by the use of may,
        can, must, might, could, would, or should; as, I may go;
        he can write.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Cautery \Cau"ter*y\, n.; pl. Cauteries. [L. cauterium, Gr. ?.
     See Cauter.]
     1. (Med.) A burning or searing, as of morbid flesh, with a
        hot iron, or by application of a caustic that will burn,
        corrode, or destroy animal tissue.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The iron of other agent in cauterizing.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Actual cautery, a substance or agent (as a hot iron) which
        cauterizes or sears by actual heat; or the burning so
        effected.
  
     Potential cautery, a substance which cauterizes by chemical
        action; as, lunar caustic; also, the cauterizing produced
        by such substance.
        [1913 Webster]

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