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2 definitions found
 for Potter''s field
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Potter \Pot"ter\, n. [Cf. F. potier.]
     1. One whose occupation is to make earthen vessels. --Ps. ii.
        9.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The potter heard, and stopped his wheel.
                                                    --Longfellow.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. One who hawks crockery or earthenware. [Prov. Eng.] --De
        Quincey.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. One who pots meats or other eatables.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Zool.) The red-bellied terrapin. See Terrapin.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Potter's asthma (Med.), emphysema of the lungs; -- so
        called because very prevalent among potters. --Parkers.
  
     Potter's clay. See under Clay.
  
     Potter's field, a public burial place, especially in a
        city, for paupers, unknown persons, and criminals; -- so
        named from the field south of Jerusalem, mentioned in
        --Matt. xxvii. 7.
  
     Potter's ore. See Alquifou.
  
     Potter's wheel, a horizontal revolving disk on which the
        clay is molded into form with the hands or tools. "My
        thoughts are whirled like a potter's wheel." --Shak.
  
     Potter wasp (Zool.), a small solitary wasp ({Eumenes
        fraternal) which constructs a globular nest of mud and
        sand in which it deposits insect larv[ae], such as
        cankerworms, as food for its young.
        [1913 Webster]

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Potters field
     the name given to the piece of ground which was afterwards
     bought with the money that had been given to Judas. It was
     called the "field of blood" (Matt. 27:7-10). Tradition places it
     in the valley of Hinnom. (See ACELDAMA.)
     

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