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3 definitions found
 for Sugar of milk
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  lactose \lac"tose`\ (l[a^]k"t[=o]s`), n.
     1. (Physiol. Chem.) The main sugar present in milk, called
        also sugar of milk or milk sugar. When isolated pure
        it is obtained crystalline; it is separable from the whey
        by evaporation and crystallization. It is a disaccharide
        with the formula C12H22O11, being chemically
        4-([beta]-D-galactosido)-D-glucose. It has a slightly
        sweet taste, is dextrorotary, and is much less soluble in
        water than either cane sugar or glucose. Formerly called
        lactin. When hydrolyzed it yields glucose and galactose.
        In cells it may be hydrolyzed by the enzyme
        [beta]-galactosidase.
        [1913 Webster +PJC]
  
     2. (Chem.) See Galactose.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Milk \Milk\ (m[i^]lk), n. [AS. meoluc, meoloc, meolc, milc; akin
     to OFries. meloc, D. melk, G. milch, OHG. miluh, Icel.
     mj[=o]lk, Sw. mj["o]lk, Dan. melk, Goth. miluks, G. melken to
     milk, OHG. melchan, Lith. milszti, L. mulgere, Gr.
     'ame`lgein. [root]107. Cf. Milch, Emulsion, Milt soft
     roe of fishes.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. (Physiol.) A white fluid secreted by the mammary glands of
        female mammals for the nourishment of their young,
        consisting of minute globules of fat suspended in a
        solution of casein, albumin, milk sugar, and inorganic
        salts. "White as morne milk." --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. (Bot.) A kind of juice or sap, usually white in color,
        found in certain plants; latex. See Latex.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. An emulsion made by bruising seeds; as, the milk of
        almonds, produced by pounding almonds with sugar and
        water.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Zool.) The ripe, undischarged spat of an oyster.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Condensed milk. See under Condense, v. t.
  
     Milk crust (Med.), vesicular eczema occurring on the face
        and scalp of nursing infants. See Eczema.
  
     Milk fever.
        (a) (Med.) A fever which accompanies or precedes the first
            lactation. It is usually transitory.
        (b) (Vet. Surg.) A form puerperal peritonitis in cattle;
            also, a variety of meningitis occurring in cows after
            calving.
  
     Milk glass, glass having a milky appearance.
  
     Milk knot (Med.), a hard lump forming in the breast of a
        nursing woman, due to obstruction to the flow of milk and
        congestion of the mammary glands.
  
     Milk leg (Med.), a swollen condition of the leg, usually in
        puerperal women, caused by an inflammation of veins, and
        characterized by a white appearance occasioned by an
        accumulation of serum and sometimes of pus in the cellular
        tissue.
  
     Milk meats, food made from milk, as butter and cheese.
        [Obs.] --Bailey.
  
     Milk mirror. Same as Escutcheon, 2.
  
     Milk molar (Anat.), one of the deciduous molar teeth which
        are shed and replaced by the premolars.
  
     Milk of lime (Chem.), a watery emulsion of calcium hydrate,
        produced by macerating quicklime in water.
  
     Milk parsley (Bot.), an umbelliferous plant ({Peucedanum
        palustre) of Europe and Asia, having a milky juice.
  
     Milk+pea+(Bot.),+a+genus+({Galactia">Milk pea (Bot.), a genus ({Galactia) of leguminous and,
        usually, twining plants.
  
     Milk sickness (Med.), See milk sickness in the
        vocabulary.
  
     Milk snake (Zool.), a harmless American snake ({Ophibolus
        triangulus, or Ophibolus eximius). It is variously
        marked with white, gray, and red. Called also milk
        adder, chicken snake, house snake, etc.
  
     Milk sugar. (Physiol. Chem.) See Lactose, and Sugar of
        milk (below).
  
     Milk thistle (Bot.), an esculent European thistle ({Silybum
        marianum), having the veins of its leaves of a milky
        whiteness.
  
     Milk thrush. (Med.) See Thrush.
  
     Milk tooth (Anat.), one of the temporary first set of teeth
        in young mammals; in man there are twenty.
  
     Milk tree (Bot.), a tree yielding a milky juice, as the cow
        tree of South America ({Brosimum Galactodendron), and the
        Euphorbia balsamifera of the Canaries, the milk of both
        of which is wholesome food.
  
     Milk vessel (Bot.), a special cell in the inner bark of a
        plant, or a series of cells, in which the milky juice is
        contained. See Latex.
  
     Rock milk. See Agaric mineral, under Agaric.
  
     Sugar of milk. The sugar characteristic of milk; a hard
        white crystalline slightly sweet substance obtained by
        evaporation of the whey of milk. It is used in pellets and
        powder as a vehicle for homeopathic medicines, and as an
        article of diet. See Lactose.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Sugar \Sug"ar\, n. [OE. sugre, F. sucre (cf. It. zucchero, Sp.
     az['u]car), fr. Ar. sukkar, assukkar, fr. Skr. [,c]arkar[=a]
     sugar, gravel; cf. Per. shakar. Cf. Saccharine, Sucrose.]
     1. A sweet white (or brownish yellow) crystalline substance,
        of a sandy or granular consistency, obtained by
        crystallizing the evaporated juice of certain plants, as
        the sugar cane, sorghum, beet root, sugar maple, etc. It
        is used for seasoning and preserving many kinds of food
        and drink. Ordinary sugar is essentially sucrose. See the
        Note below.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The term sugar includes several commercial grades, as
           the white or refined, granulated, loaf or lump, and the
           raw brown or muscovado. In a more general sense, it
           includes several distinct chemical compounds, as the
           glucoses, or grape sugars (including glucose proper,
           dextrose, and levulose), and the sucroses, or true
           sugars (as cane sugar). All sugars are carbohydrates.
           See Carbohydrate. The glucoses, or grape sugars, are
           ketone alcohols of the formula C6H12O6, and they turn
           the plane of polarization to the right or the left.
           They are produced from the amyloses and sucroses, as by
           the action of heat and acids of ferments, and are
           themselves decomposed by fermentation into alcohol and
           carbon dioxide. The only sugar (called acrose) as yet
           produced artificially belongs to this class. The
           sucroses, or cane sugars, are doubled glucose
           anhydrides of the formula C12H22O11. They are usually
           not fermentable as such (cf. Sucrose), and they act
           on polarized light.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. By extension, anything resembling sugar in taste or
        appearance; as, sugar of lead (lead acetate), a poisonous
        white crystalline substance having a sweet taste.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Compliment or flattery used to disguise or render
        acceptable something obnoxious; honeyed or soothing words.
        [Colloq.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Acorn sugar. See Quercite.
  
     Cane sugar, sugar made from the sugar cane; sucrose, or an
        isomeric sugar. See Sucrose.
  
     Diabetes sugar, or Diabetic sugar (Med. Chem.), a variety
        of sugar (grape sugar or dextrose) excreted in the urine
        in diabetes mellitus; -- the presence of such a sugar in
        the urine is used to diagnose the illness.
  
     Fruit sugar. See under Fruit, and Fructose.
  
     Grape sugar, a sirupy or white crystalline sugar (dextrose
        or glucose) found as a characteristic ingredient of ripe
        grapes, and also produced from many other sources. See
        Dextrose, and Glucose.
  
     Invert sugar. See under Invert.
  
     Malt sugar, a variety of sugar isomeric with sucrose, found
        in malt. See Maltose.
  
     Manna sugar, a substance found in manna, resembling, but
        distinct from, the sugars. See Mannite.
  
     Milk sugar, a variety of sugar characteristic of fresh
        milk, and isomeric with sucrose. See Lactose.
  
     Muscle sugar, a sweet white crystalline substance isomeric
        with, and formerly regarded to, the glucoses. It is found
        in the tissue of muscle, the heart, liver, etc. Called
        also heart sugar. See Inosite.
  
     Pine sugar. See Pinite.
  
     Starch sugar (Com. Chem.), a variety of dextrose made by
        the action of heat and acids on starch from corn,
        potatoes, etc.; -- called also potato sugar, corn
        sugar, and, inaccurately, invert sugar. See Dextrose,
        and Glucose.
  
     Sugar barek, one who refines sugar.
  
     Sugar+beet+(Bot.),+a+variety+of+beet+({Beta+vulgaris">Sugar beet (Bot.), a variety of beet ({Beta vulgaris) with
        very large white roots, extensively grown, esp. in Europe,
        for the sugar obtained from them.
  
     Sugar berry (Bot.), the hackberry.
  
     Sugar bird (Zool.), any one of several species of small
        South American singing birds of the genera Coereba,
        Dacnis, and allied genera belonging to the family
        Coerebidae. They are allied to the honey eaters.
  
     Sugar bush. See Sugar orchard.
  
     Sugar camp, a place in or near a sugar orchard, where maple
        sugar is made.
  
     Sugar candian, sugar candy. [Obs.]
  
     Sugar candy, sugar clarified and concreted or crystallized;
        candy made from sugar.
  
     Sugar cane (Bot.), a tall perennial grass ({Saccharum
        officinarium), with thick short-jointed stems. It has
        been cultivated for ages as the principal source of sugar.
        
  
     Sugar loaf.
        (a) A loaf or mass of refined sugar, usually in the form
            of a truncated cone.
        (b) A hat shaped like a sugar loaf.
            [1913 Webster]
  
                  Why, do not or know you, grannam, and that sugar
                  loaf?                             --J. Webster.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     Sugar+maple+(Bot.),+the+rock+maple+({Acer+saccharinum">Sugar maple (Bot.), the rock maple ({Acer saccharinum).
        See Maple.
  
     Sugar mill, a machine for pressing out the juice of the
        sugar cane, usually consisting of three or more rollers,
        between which the cane is passed.
  
     Sugar mite. (Zool.)
        (a) A small mite ({Tyroglyphus sacchari), often found in
            great numbers in unrefined sugar.
        (b) The lepisma.
  
     Sugar of lead. See Sugar, 2, above.
  
     Sugar of milk. See under Milk.
  
     Sugar orchard, a collection of maple trees selected and
        preserved for purpose of obtaining sugar from them; --
        called also, sometimes, sugar bush. [U.S.] --Bartlett.
  
     Sugar pine (Bot.), an immense coniferous tree ({Pinus
        Lambertiana) of California and Oregon, furnishing a soft
        and easily worked timber. The resinous exudation from the
        stumps, etc., has a sweetish taste, and has been used as a
        substitute for sugar.
  
     Sugar squirrel (Zool.), an Australian flying phalanger
        ({Belideus sciureus), having a long bushy tail and a
        large parachute. It resembles a flying squirrel. See
        Illust. under Phlanger.
  
     Sugar tongs, small tongs, as of silver, used at table for
        taking lumps of sugar from a sugar bowl.
  
     Sugar tree. (Bot.) See Sugar maple, above.
        [1913 Webster]

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