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6 definitions found
 for Throne
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Throne \Throne\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Throned; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Throning.]
     1. To place on a royal seat; to enthrone. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To place in an elevated position; to give sovereignty or
        dominion to; to exalt.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              True image of the Father, whether throned
              In the bosom of bliss, and light of light. --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Throne \Throne\, v. i.
     To be in, or sit upon, a throne; to be placed as if upon a
     throne. --Shak.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Throne \Throne\, n. [OE. trone, F. tr[^o]ne, L. thronus, Gr. ?;
     cf. ? a bench, ? a footstool, ? to set one's self, to sit,
     Skr. dhara[.n]a supporting, dh[.r] to hold fast, carry, and
     E. firm, a.]
     1. A chair of state, commonly a royal seat, but sometimes the
        seat of a prince, bishop, or other high dignitary.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The noble king is set up in his throne. --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              High on a throne of royal state.      --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Hence, sovereign power and dignity; also, the one who
        occupies a throne, or is invested with sovereign
        authority; an exalted or dignified personage.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Only in the throne will I be greater than thou.
                                                    --Gen. xli.
                                                    40.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              To mold a mighty state's decrees,
              And shape the whisper of the throne.  --Tennyson.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. pl. A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; --
        a meaning given by the schoolmen. --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Great Sire! whom thrones celestial ceaseless sing.
                                                    --Young.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  throne
      n 1: the chair of state for a monarch, bishop, etc.; "the king
           sat on his throne"
      2: a plumbing fixture for defecation and urination [syn:
         toilet, can, commode, crapper, pot, potty,
         stool, throne]
      3: the position and power of an exalted person (a sovereign or
         bishop) who is entitled to sit in a chair of state on
         ceremonial occasions
      v 1: sit on the throne as a ruler
      2: put a monarch on the throne; "The Queen was enthroned more
         than 50 years ago" [syn: enthrone, throne] [ant:
         dethrone]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  60 Moby Thesaurus words for "throne":
     Peacock throne, aggrandize, anoint, apotheose, apotheosize,
     beatify, bedpan, can, canonize, chair, chamber, chamber pot,
     chemical closet, chemical toilet, commode, crapper, crown, deify,
     elevate, ennoble, enshrine, enthrone, exalt, gaddi, glamorize,
     glorify, head, immortalize, inaugurate, induct, install, instate,
     invest, jerry, john, johnny, jordan, latrine, lionize, loo,
     magnify, make legendary, piss pot, place, place in office, pot,
     potty, potty-chair, put in, raise, royal seat, saint, sanctify,
     set up, stool, thunder mug, toilet, uplift, urinal, water closet
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Throne
     (Heb. kiss'e), a royal chair or seat of dignity (Deut. 17:18; 2
     Sam. 7:13; Ps. 45:6); an elevated seat with a canopy and
     hangings, which cover it. It denotes the seat of the high priest
     in 1 Sam. 1:9; 4:13, and of a provincial governor in Neh. 3:7
     and Ps. 122:5. The throne of Solomon is described at length in 1
     Kings 10:18-20.
     

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