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1 definition found
 for Thrust plane
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Thrust \Thrust\, n.
     1. A violent push or driving, as with a pointed weapon moved
        in the direction of its length, or with the hand or foot,
        or with any instrument; a stab; -- a word much used as a
        term of fencing.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              [Polites] Pyrrhus with his lance pursues,
              And often reaches, and his thrusts renews. --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. An attack; an assault.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              One thrust at your pure, pretended mechanism. --Dr.
                                                    H. More.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Mech.) The force or pressure of one part of a
        construction against other parts; especially (Arch.), a
        horizontal or diagonal outward pressure, as of an arch
        against its abutments, or of rafters against the wall
        which support them.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Mining) The breaking down of the roof of a gallery under
        its superincumbent weight.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Thrust bearing (Screw Steamers), a bearing arranged to
        receive the thrust or endwise pressure of the screw shaft.
        
  
     Thrust plane (Geol.), the surface along which dislocation
        has taken place in the case of a reversed fault.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Push; shove; assault; attack.
  
     Usage: Thrust, Push, Shove. Push and shove usually
            imply the application of force by a body already in
            contact with the body to be impelled. Thrust, often,
            but not always, implies the impulse or application of
            force by a body which is in motion before it reaches
            the body to be impelled.
            [1913 Webster]

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