dict.org

The DICT Development Group


Search for:
Search type:
Database:

Database copyright information
Server information
Wiki: Resources, links, and other information


1 definition found
 for To ride down
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Ride \Ride\, v. t.
     1. To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse; to
        ride a bicycle.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              [They] rend up both rocks and hills, and ride the
              air
              In whirlwind.                         --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To manage insolently at will; to domineer over.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by
              bakers, cobblers, and brewers.        --Swift.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To convey, as by riding; to make or do by riding.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Tue only men that safe can ride
              Mine errands on the Scottish side.    --Sir W.
                                                    Scott.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Surg.) To overlap (each other); -- said of bones or
        fractured fragments.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To ride a hobby, to have some favorite occupation or
        subject of talk.
  
     To ride and tie, to take turn with another in labor and
        rest; -- from the expedient adopted by two persons with
        one horse, one of whom rides the animal a certain
        distance, and then ties him for the use of the other, who
        is coming up on foot. --Fielding.
  
     To ride down.
        (a) To ride over; to trample down in riding; to overthrow
            by riding against; as, to ride down an enemy.
        (b) (Naut.) To bear down, as on a halyard when hoisting a
            sail.
  
     To ride out (Naut.), to keep safe afloat during (a storm)
        while riding at anchor or when hove to on the open sea;
        as, to ride out the gale.
        [1913 Webster]

Questions or comments about this site? Contact webmaster@dict.org