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1 definition found
 for Tougher
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tough \Tough\, a. [Compar. Tougher; superl. Toughest.] [OE.
     tough, AS. t[=o]h, akin to D. taai, LG. taa, tage, tau, OHG.
     z[=a]hi, G. z[aum]he, and also to AS. getenge near to, close
     to, oppressive, OS. bitengi.]
     1. Having the quality of flexibility without brittleness;
        yielding to force without breaking; capable of resisting
        great strain; as, the ligaments of animals are remarkably
        tough. "Tough roots and stubs. " --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Not easily broken; able to endure hardship; firm; strong;
        -- of objects and people; as, tough sinews. --Cowper.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A body made of brass, the crone demands, . . .
              Tough to the last, and with no toil to tire.
                                                    --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The basis of his character was caution combined with
              tough tenacity of purpose.            --J. A.
                                                    Symonds.
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     3. Not easily separated; viscous; clammy; tenacious; as,
        tough phlegm.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Stiff; rigid; not flexible; stubborn; as, a tough bow.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              So tough a frame she could not bend.  --Dryden.
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     5. Severe; violent; as, a tough storm. [Colloq.] " A tough
        debate. " --Fuller.
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     6. Difficult to do, perform, or accomplish; as, a tough job.
        [PJC]
  
     7. Prone to aggressive or violent behavior; rowdyish; -- of
        people, or groups; as, a tough neighborhood; a tough
        character.
        [PJC]
  
     To make it tough, to make it a matter of difficulty; to
        make it a hard matter. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]

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