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7 definitions found
 for Tuck
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tuck \Tuck\, v. i.
     To contract; to draw together. [Obs.]
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tuck \Tuck\, n.
     1. A horizontal sewed fold, such as is made in a garment, to
        shorten it; a plait.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A small net used for taking fish from a larger one; --
        called also tuck-net.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. A pull; a lugging. [Obs.] See Tug. --Life of A. Wood.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Naut.) The part of a vessel where the ends of the bottom
        planks meet under the stern.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. Food; pastry; sweetmeats. [Slang] --T. Hughes.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tuck \Tuck\, n. [F. estoc; cf. It. stocco; both of German
     origin, and akin to E. stock. See Stock.]
     A long, narrow sword; a rapier. [Obs.] --Shak.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           He wore large hose, and a tuck, as it was then called,
           or rapier, of tremendous length.         --Sir W. Scot.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tuck \Tuck\, n. [Cf. Tocsin.]
     The beat of a drum. --Scot.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tuck \Tuck\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tucked; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Tucking.] [OE. tukken, LG. tukken to pull up, tuck up,
     entice; akin to OD. tocken to entice, G. zucken to draw with
     a short and quick motion, and E. tug. See Tug.]
     1. To draw up; to shorten; to fold under; to press into a
        narrower compass; as, to tuck the bedclothes in; to tuck
        up one's sleeves.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To make a tuck or tucks in; as, to tuck a dress.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To inclose; to put within; to press into a close place;
        as, to tuck a child into a bed; to tuck a book under one's
        arm, or into a pocket.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. [Perhaps originally, to strike, beat: cf. F. toquer to
        touch. Cf. Tocsin.] To full, as cloth. [Prov. Eng.]
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  tuck
      n 1: eatables (especially sweets)
      2: (sports) a bodily position adopted in some sports (such as
         diving or skiing) in which the knees are bent and the thighs
         are drawn close to the chest
      3: a narrow flattened pleat or fold that is stitched in place
      4: a straight sword with a narrow blade and two edges [syn:
         rapier, tuck]
      v 1: fit snugly into; "insert your ticket into the slot"; "tuck
           your shirttail in" [syn: tuck, insert]
      2: make a tuck or several folds in; "tuck the fabric"; "tuck in
         the sheet"
      3: draw together into folds or puckers [syn: gather, pucker,
         tuck]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  53 Moby Thesaurus words for "tuck":
     birr, bread, chow, crease, creasing, crimp, crisp, dog-ear, double,
     double over, doubling, duplicature, eats, enfold, feed, flection,
     flexure, flounce, flute, fold, fold over, frill, gather, go, grub,
     hardihood, infold, interfold, lap over, lapel, lappet, meat, moxie,
     pep, plait, plat, pleat, plica, plicate, plication, plicature, ply,
     potency, provender, quill, ruche, ruching, ruff, ruffle, scoff,
     turn over, twill, vigor
  
  

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