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2 definitions found
 for Utter barrister
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Utter \Ut"ter\, a. [OE. utter, originally the same word as
     outer. See Out, and cf. Outer, Utmost.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. Outer. "Thine utter eyen." --Chaucer. [Obs.] "By him a
        shirt and utter mantle laid." --Chapman.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              As doth an hidden moth
              The inner garment fret, not th' utter touch.
                                                    --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Situated on the outside, or extreme limit; remote from the
        center; outer. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Through utter and through middle darkness borne.
                                                    --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The very utter part pf Saint Adelmes point is five
              miles from Sandwich.                  --Holinshed.
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     3. Complete; perfect; total; entire; absolute; as, utter
        ruin; utter darkness.
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              They . . . are utter strangers to all those anxious
              thoughts which disquiet mankind.      --Atterbury.
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     4. Peremptory; unconditional; unqualified; final; as, an
        utter refusal or denial. --Clarendon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Utter bar (Law), the whole body of junior barristers. See
        Outer bar, under 1st Outer. [Eng.]
  
     Utter barrister (Law), one recently admitted as barrister,
        who is accustomed to plead without, or outside, the bar,
        as distinguished from the benchers, who are sometimes
        permitted to plead within the bar. [Eng.] --Cowell.
        [1913 Webster]

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  UTTER BARRISTER, English law, Those barristers who plead without the bar, 
  and are distinguished from benchers, or those who have been readers and who 
  are allowed to plead within the bar, as the king's counsel are. The same as 
  ouster barrister. See Barrister. 
  
  

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