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6 definitions found
 for Welter
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Welter \Wel"ter\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Weltered; p. pr. & vb.
     n. Weltering.] [Freq. of OE. walten to roll over, AS.
     wealtan; akin to LG. weltern, G. walzen to roll, to waltz,
     sich w[aum]lzen to welter, OHG. walzan to roll, Icel. velta,
     Dan. v[ae]lte, Sw. v[aum]ltra, v[aum]lta; cf. Goth. waltjan;
     probably akin to E. wallow, well, v. i. [root]146. See
     Well, v. i., and cf. Waltz.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. To roll, as the body of an animal; to tumble about,
        especially in anything foul or defiling; to wallow.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              When we welter in pleasures and idleness, then we
              eat and drink with drunkards.         --Latimer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              These wizards welter in wealth's waves. --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              He must not float upon his watery bier
              Unwept, and welter to the parching wind,
              Without the meed of some melodious tear. --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The priests at the altar . . . weltering in their
              blood.                                --Landor.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To rise and fall, as waves; to tumble over, as billows.
        "The weltering waves." --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Waves that, hardly weltering, die away.
                                                    --Wordsworth.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Through this blindly weltering sea.   --Trench.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Welter \Wel"ter\, v. t. [Cf. Wilt, v. i.]
     To wither; to wilt. [R.]
     [1913 Webster]
  
           Weltered hearts and blighted . . . memories. --I.
                                                    Taylor.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Welter \Wel"ter\, a. (Horse Racing)
     Of, pertaining to, or designating, the most heavily weighted
     race in a meeting; as, a welter race; the welter stakes.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Welter \Wel"ter\, n.
     [1913 Webster]
     1. That in which any person or thing welters, or wallows;
        filth; mire; slough.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The foul welter of our so-called religious or other
              controversies.                        --Carlyle.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A rising or falling, as of waves; as, the welter of the
        billows; the welter of a tempest.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  welter
      n 1: a confused multitude of things [syn: clutter, jumble,
           muddle, fuddle, mare's nest, welter, smother]
      v 1: toss, roll, or rise and fall in an uncontrolled way; "The
           shipwrecked survivors weltered in the sea for hours"
      2: roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud" [syn: wallow,
         welter]
      3: be immersed in; "welter in work"

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  77 Moby Thesaurus words for "welter":
     arsy-varsiness, bask, bend, blunder, careen, career, clutter,
     cower, cringe, crouch, falter, farrago, flounce, flounder,
     get down, grovel, hash, heave, helter-skelter, higgledy-piggledy,
     hobbyhorse, hodgepodge, hunch, hunch down, hysteron proteron,
     indulge, jumble, labor, litter, lurch, luxuriate,
     make heavy weather, mess, mishmash, mummify, mummy, pitch,
     pitch and plunge, pitch and toss, plunge, pound, rear, reel, revel,
     rock, roll, rollick, scend, scramble, scrouch down, seethe,
     shrivel, squat, stagger, stoop, strive, struggle, stumble, sway,
     swing, thrash about, topsy-turviness, topsy-turvydom, toss,
     toss and tumble, toss and turn, totter, tumble, turmoil,
     unholy mess, volutation, wallop, wallow, wilt, wizen, writhe,
     yaw
  
  

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