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3 definitions found
 for accusation
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Accusation \Ac`cu*sa"tion\, n. [OF. acusation, F. accusation, L.
     accusatio, fr. accusare. See Accuse.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. The act of accusing or charging with a crime or with a
        lighter offense.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              We come not by the way of accusation
              To taint that honor every good tongue blesses.
                                                    --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. That of which one is accused; the charge of an offense or
        crime, or the declaration containing the charge.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              [They] set up over his head his accusation. --Matt.
                                                    xxvii. 37.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Impeachment; crimination; censure; charge.
          [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  accusation
      n 1: a formal charge of wrongdoing brought against a person; the
           act of imputing blame or guilt [syn: accusation,
           accusal]
      2: an assertion that someone is guilty of a fault or offence;
         "the newspaper published charges that Jones was guilty of
         drunken driving" [syn: accusation, charge]

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  ACCUSATION, crim. law. A charge made to a competent officer against one who
  has committed a crime or misdemeanor, so that he may be brought to justice
  and punishment.
       2. A neglect to accuse may in some cases be considered a misdemeanor,
  or misprision. (q.v.) 1 Bro. Civ. Law, 247; 2 Id. 389; Inst. lib. 4, tit.
  18.
       3. It is a rule that no man is bound to accuse himself, or to testify
  against himself in a criminal case. Accusare nemo se debet nisi coram Deo.
  Vide Evidence; Interest; Witness.
  
  

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