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4 definitions found
 for altogether
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Altogether \Al`to*geth"er\, adv. [OE. altogedere; al all +
     togedere together. See Together.]
     1. All together; conjointly. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Altogether they went at once.         --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Without exception; wholly; completely.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Every man at his best state is altogether vanity.
                                                    --Ps. xxxix.
                                                    5.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  altogether \altogether\ n.
     1. nakedness; -- used mostly in the phrase "in the
        altogether". [informal]
  
     Syn: raw, buff, birthday suit
          [WordNet 1.5]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  altogether
      adv 1: to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent
             (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly'); "he was
             wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal";
             "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was
             completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the
             directions were all wrong"; "it was not altogether her
             fault"; "an altogether new approach"; "a whole new idea"
             [syn: wholly, entirely, completely, totally,
             all, altogether, whole] [ant: part, partially,
             partly]
      2: with everything included or counted; "altogether he earns
         close to a million dollars" [syn: altogether, all told,
         in all]
      3: with everything considered (and neglecting details);
         "altogether, I'm sorry it happened"; "all in all, it's not so
         bad" [syn: all in all, on the whole, altogether, tout
         ensemble]
      n 1: informal terms for nakedness; "in the raw"; "in the
           altogether"; "in his birthday suit" [syn: raw,
           altogether, birthday suit]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  141 Moby Thesaurus words for "altogether":
     above, absolutely, across the board, additionally, again, all,
     all in all, all included, all put together, all things considered,
     all told, also, among other things, and all, and also, and so,
     as a body, as a rule, as a whole, as an approximation, as well,
     at large, au reste, bareness, beside, besides, beyond,
     birthday suit, bodily, broadly, broadly speaking, by and large,
     chiefly, collectively, commonly, completely, comprehensively,
     corporately, decollete, ecdysiast, else, en bloc, en masse,
     en plus, entirely, exactly, exhaustively, extra, farther,
     for lagniappe, fully, further, furthermore, generally,
     generally speaking, globally, gymnosophist, gymnosophy,
     hundred per cent, in a body, in addition, in all, in all respects,
     in bulk, in full, in full measure, in general, in its entirety,
     in the aggregate, in the gross, in the lump, in the main,
     in the mass, in toto, inclusively, inside out, integrally,
     inter alia, into the bargain, item, just, largely, likewise,
     mainly, more, moreover, mostly, nakedness, naturism, naturist,
     normally, not a stitch, nudism, nudist, nudity, on all counts,
     on balance, on the side, on the whole, on top of, one and all,
     ordinarily, outright, over, overall, perfectly, plumb, plus,
     predominantly, prevailingly, quite, right, roughly,
     roughly speaking, roundly, routinely, similarly,
     speaking generally, state of nature, stick, stripper, stripteaser,
     the altogether, the nude, the raw, then, therewith, thoroughly,
     to boot, to the hilt, too, toplessness, totally, tout a fait,
     tout ensemble, unconditionally, unreservedly, usually, utterly,
     wholly, yet
  
  

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