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4 definitions found
 for authentication
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  authentication \authentication\ n.
     a mark on an article of trade to indicate its origin and
     authenticity.
  
     Syn: hallmark, assay-mark.
          [WordNet 1.5]
  
     2. validating the authenticity of something or someone.
  
     Syn: certification.
          [WordNet 1.5]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  authentication
      n 1: a mark on an article of trade to indicate its origin and
           authenticity [syn: authentication, hallmark, assay-
           mark]
      2: validating the authenticity of something or someone [syn:
         authentication, certification]

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  authentication
  
      The verification of the identity of a person or
     process.  In a communication system, authentication verifies
     that messages really come from their stated source, like the
     signature on a (paper) letter.  The most common form of
     authentication is typing a user name (which may be widely
     known or easily guessable) and a corresponding password that
     is presumed to be known only to the individual being
     authenticated.  Another form of authentication is
     biometrics.
  
     (2007-02-22)
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  AUTHENTICATION, practice. An attestation made by a proper officer, by which
  he certifies that a record is in due form of law, and that the person who
  certifies it is the officer appointed by law to do so.
       2. The Constitution of the U. S., art. 4, s. 1, declares, "Full faith
  and credit shall be given in each state to the public acts, records and
  judicial proceedings of every other state. And congress may by general laws
  prescribe the manner in which such acts,, records and proceedings shall be
  proved, and the effect thereof." The object of the authentication is to
  supply all other proof of the record. The laws of the United States have
  provided a mode of authentication of public records and office papers; these
  acts are here transcribed.
       3. By the Act of May 26, 1790, it is provided, "That the act of the
  legislatures of the several states shall be authenticated by having the seal
  of their respective states affixed thereto: That the records and judicial
  proceedings of the courts of any state shall be proved or admitted, in any
  other court within the United States, by the attestation of the clerk, and
  the seal of the court annexed, if there be a seal, together with a
  certificate of the judge, chief justice or presiding magistrate, as the case
  may be, that the said attestation is in due form. And the said records and
  judicial proceedings, authenticated as aforesaid, shall have such faith and
  credit given to them, in every court within the United States, as they have,
  by law or usage, in the courts of the state from whence the said records
  are, or shall be taken."
       4. The above act having provided only for one species of record, it was
  necessary to pass the Act of March 27, 1804, to provide for other cases. By
  this act it is enacted, Sec. 1.  "That, from and after the passage of this
  act, all records and exemplifications of office books, which are or may be
  kept in any public office of any state, not appertaining to a court, shall
  be proved or admitted in any other court or office in any other state, by
  the attestation of the keeper of the said records or books, and the seal of
  his office thereto annexed, if there be a seal, together with a certificate
  of the presiding justice of the court of the county or district, as the case
  may be, in which such office is or may be kept or of the governor, the
  secretary of state, the chancellor or the keeper of the great seal of the
  state, that the said attestation is in due form, and by the proper officer
  and the said certificate, if given by the presiding justice of a court,
  shall be further authenticated by the clerk or prothonotary of the said
  court, who shall certify, under his hand and the seal of his office, that
  the said presiding justice is duly commissioned and qualified; or if the
  said certificate be given by the; governor, the secretary of state, the
  chancellor or keeper of the great seal, it shall be under the great seal of
  the state in which the said certificate is made. And the said records and
  exemplifications, authenticated as aforesaid, shall have such faith and
  credit given to them in every court and office within the United States, as
  they have by law or usage in the courts or offices of the state from whence
  the same are or shall be taken."
       5.-2. That all the provisions of this act, and the act to which this
  is, a supplement, shall apply, as well to the public acts, records, office
  books, judicial proceedings, courts, and offices of the respective
  territories of the United States, and countries subject to the jurisdiction
  of the United States, as to the public acts, records, office books, judicial
  proceedings, courts and offices of the several states."
       6. The Act of May 8, 1792, s. 12, provides: That all the records and
  proceedings of the court of appeals, heretofore appointed, previous to the
  adoption of the present constitution, shall be deposited in the office of
  the clerk of the supreme court of the United States, who is hereby
  authorized and directed to give copies of all such records and proceedings,
  to any person requiring and paying for the same, in like manner as copies of
  the records and other proceedings of the said court are by law directed to
  be given; which copies shall have like faith and credit as all other
  proceedings of the said court."
       7. By authentication is also understood whatever act is done either by
  the party or some other person with a view of causing an instrument to be
  known and identified as for example, the acknowledgment of a deed by the
  grantor; the attesting a deed by witnesses. 2 Benth. on Ev. 449.
  
  

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