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15 definitions found
 for bit
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\ (Computers) [binary digit.]
     1. the smallest unit of information, equivalent to a choice
        between two alternatives, as yes or no; on or off.
        [PJC]
  
     2. (Computers) the physical representation of a bit of
        information in a computer memory or a data storage medium.
        Within a computer circuit a bit may be represented by the
        state of a current or an electrical charge; in a magnetic
        storage medium it may be represented by the direction of
        magnetization; on a punched card or on paper tape it may
        be represented by the presence or absence of a hole at a
        particular point on the card or tape.
        [PJC]
  
     Bit my bit, piecemeal. --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\ (b[i^]t), n. [OE. bitt, bite, AS. bite, bite, fr.
     b[imac]tan to bite. See Bite, n. & v., and cf. Bit a
     morsel.]
     1. The part of a bridle, usually of iron, which is inserted
        in the mouth of a horse, and having appendages to which
        the reins are fastened. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The foamy bridle with the bit of gold. --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Fig.: Anything which curbs or restrains.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\, n.
     In the British West Indies, a fourpenny piece, or groat.
     [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bitted; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Bitting.]
     To put a bridle upon; to put the bit in the mouth of.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\,
     imp. & p. p. of Bite.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\, n. [OE. bite, AS. bita, fr. b[imac]tan to bite; akin
     to D. beet, G. bissen bit, morsel, Icel. biti. See Bite,
     v., and cf. Bit part of a bridle.]
     1. A part of anything, such as may be bitten off or taken
        into the mouth; a morsel; a bite. Hence: A small piece of
        anything; a little; a mite.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Somewhat; something, but not very great.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              My young companion was a bit of a poet. --T. Hook.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: This word is used, also, like jot and whit, to express
           the smallest degree; as, he is not a bit wiser.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     3. A tool for boring, of various forms and sizes, usually
        turned by means of a brace or bitstock. See Bitstock.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. The part of a key which enters the lock and acts upon the
        bolt and tumblers. --Knight.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. The cutting iron of a plane. --Knight.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. In the Southern and Southwestern States, a small silver
        coin (as the real) formerly current; commonly, one worth
        about 12 1/2 cents; also, the sum of 12 1/2 cents.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bite \Bite\ (b[imac]t), v. t. [imp. Bit (b[i^]t); p. p.
     Bitten (b[i^]t"t'n), Bit; p. pr. & vb. n. Biting.] [OE.
     biten, AS. b[imac]tan; akin to D. bijten, OS. b[imac]tan,
     OHG. b[imac]zan, G. beissen, Goth. beitan, Icel. b[imac]ta,
     Sw. bita, Dan. bide, L. findere to cleave, Skr. bhid to
     cleave. [root]87. Cf. Fissure.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the
        thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth;
        as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Such smiling rogues as these,
              Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To puncture, abrade, or sting with an organ (of some
        insects) used in taking food.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To cause sharp pain, or smarting, to; to hurt or injure,
        in a literal or a figurative sense; as, pepper bites the
        mouth. "Frosts do bite the meads." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To cheat; to trick; to take in. [Colloq.] --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to; as, the
        anchor bites the ground.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The last screw of the rack having been turned so
              often that its purchase crumbled, . . . it turned
              and turned with nothing to bite.      --Dickens.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To bite the dust, To bite the ground, to fall in the
        agonies of death; as, he made his enemy bite the dust.
  
     To bite in (Etching), to corrode or eat into metallic
        plates by means of an acid.
  
     To bite the thumb at (any one), formerly a mark of
        contempt, designed to provoke a quarrel; to defy. "Do you
        bite your thumb at us?" --Shak.
  
     To bite the tongue, to keep silence. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Bit \Bit\,
     3d sing. pr. of Bid, for biddeth. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  bit
      n 1: a small piece or quantity of something; "a spot of tea"; "a
           bit of paper"; "a bit of lint"; "I gave him a bit of my
           mind" [syn: spot, bit]
      2: a small fragment of something broken off from the whole; "a
         bit of rock caught him in the eye" [syn: bit, chip,
         flake, fleck, scrap]
      3: an indefinitely short time; "wait just a moment"; "in a mo";
         "it only takes a minute"; "in just a bit" [syn: moment,
         mo, minute, second, bit]
      4: an instance of some kind; "it was a nice piece of work"; "he
         had a bit of good luck" [syn: piece, bit]
      5: piece of metal held in horse's mouth by reins and used to
         control the horse while riding; "the horse was not accustomed
         to a bit"
      6: a unit of measurement of information (from binary + digit);
         the amount of information in a system having two equiprobable
         states; "there are 8 bits in a byte"
      7: a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left
         was a bit of bread" [syn: morsel, bit, bite]
      8: a small fragment; "overheard snatches of their conversation"
         [syn: snatch, bit]
      9: a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer
         program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had
         a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he
         ever did" [syn: act, routine, number, turn, bit]
      10: the part of a key that enters a lock and lifts the tumblers
      11: the cutting part of a drill; usually pointed and threaded
          and is replaceable in a brace or bitstock or drill press;
          "he looked around for the right size bit"

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  469 Moby Thesaurus words for "bit":
     ALGOL, COBOL, EDP, FORTRAN, a breath, a continental, a curse,
     a damn, a darn, a hoot, ace, act, actor, aculeus, acumination,
     afterpiece, allotment, allowance, alphabetic data,
     alphanumeric code, anchor watch, angular data, antagonist,
     antihero, arrest, assembler, atom, auger, back band, backstrap,
     bagatelle, bauble, bean, bearing rein, bellyband, bibelot, big end,
     bigger half, binary digit, binary scale, binary system, bit part,
     bite, blinders, blinds, borer, bowshot, brake, brass farthing,
     breeching, bridle, brief span, budget, bug, butt, button, byte,
     caparison, cast, cavesson, cent, chain, channel, character, chaser,
     check, checkrein, cheekpiece, chinband, chip, chock, chunk, cinch,
     cipher, clip, clipping, clog, close quarters, close range, collar,
     collop, command pulses, commands, commission,
     communication explosion, communication theory, compiler,
     computer code, computer language, computer program, constrain,
     contingent, control signals, controlled quantity,
     correcting signals, countercheck, crack, crownband, crumb, crupper,
     cue, curb, curb bit, curio, curtain, curtain call, curtain raiser,
     cusp, cut, cutting, dab, damper, data, data retrieval,
     data storage, day shift, deal, decoding, destiny, digit,
     divertimento, divertissement, dividend, dogwatch, dole, dollop,
     doorstop, dot, drag, drag sail, dram, dribble, driblet,
     drift anchor, drift sail, drill, drogue, drop, dwarf, earreach,
     earshot, electronic data processing, encoding, end, entropy,
     epilogue, equal share, error, error signals, exode, exodus,
     expository scene, farce, farthing, fat part, fate, feather,
     feedback pulses, feedback signals, feeder, fetter, fig, figure,
     film data, finale, fleabite, fleck, flyspeck, folderol, fragment,
     fribble, frippery, full time, gag swivel, gaud, gewgaw, gimcrack,
     girth, gob, gobbet, grain, granule, graveyard shift, groat,
     gunshot, hackamore, hair, hair space, hairbreadth, hairsbreadth,
     half, half rations, half time, halfpenny, halter, halver, hames,
     hametugs, handful, harness, headgear, headstall, heavy, helping,
     hero, heroine, hexadecimal system, hill of beans, hip straps,
     hoke act, hold back, hold down, hold in, holdback, hunk, inch,
     information, information explosion, information theory, ingenue,
     inhibit, input data, input quantity, instant, instructions,
     interest, interlude, intermezzo, intermission, introduction, iota,
     jaquima, jerk line, jest, joke, jot, kickshaw, knickknack,
     knickknackery, lead, lead role, leading lady, leading man,
     leading woman, lines, little, little bit, little ways,
     little while, lobster trick, lot, lota, lump, machine language,
     martingale, measure, meed, mere subsistence, mess, message,
     minikin, minim, minimum, minutiae, mite, mockery, modicum, moiety,
     molecule, molehill, moment, morsel, mote, mouthful, mucro,
     multiple messages, neb, needle, nib, night shift, no time, noise,
     noseband, notation, number, numeral, numeric data, numero,
     nutshell, octal system, oscillograph data, ounce, output data,
     output quantity, overtime, pair of winks, paring, part, part time,
     particle, pebble, pelham, peppercorn, percentage, person,
     personage, picayune, piece, pin, pinch, pinch of snuff, pinprick,
     pistol shot, pittance, play, point, polar data, pole strap,
     portion, prick, prickle, prologue, proportion, protagonist,
     punch-card data, quantum, quota, rake-off, random data, rap,
     rasher, ration, rectangular data, red cent, redundancy,
     reference quantity, reins, relay, remora, ribbons, role, routine,
     row of pins, ruly English, rush, saddle, scene, scoop, scotch,
     scrap, scrimption, scruple, sea anchor, segment, shackle,
     shaft tug, shard, share, shaving, shift, shit, shiver,
     short allowance, short commons, short distance, short piece,
     short spell, short time, short way, shred, shtick, side,
     side check, sign, signal, signals, single messages, sketch, skit,
     slice, sliver, small share, small space, smidgen, smitch,
     smithereen, snack, snaffle, snap, snatch, sneeshing, snip, snippet,
     song and dance, sou, soubrette, space, span, speck, spell,
     spitting distance, splinter, split schedule, split shift, spoke,
     spoonful, spot, spurt, stake, stand-up comedy act,
     starvation wages, stay, step, sting, stint, stitch, stock, stop,
     straight part, straw, stretch, striptease, stump, sunrise watch,
     supporting character, supporting role, surcingle, swing shift,
     symbol, tack, tackle, tatter, thimbleful, time, tiny bit, tip,
     title role, tittle, tour, tour of duty, toy, trammel, trappings,
     trick, trifle, trifling amount, trinket, trivia, triviality, tug,
     tuppence, turn, turn of work, two cents, two shakes, twopence,
     unorganized data, villain, visible-speech data, walk-on,
     walking part, watch, whet, whim-wham, whit, winker braces,
     withhold, work shift, yoke
  
  

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014) :

  BIT
         Basic Interconnection Test (ISO 9646-1)
         

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014) :

  BIT
         Binary digIT
         

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  bit
   n.
  
      [from the mainstream meaning and ?Binary digIT?]
  
      1. [techspeak] The unit of information; the amount of information obtained
      from knowing the answer to a yes-or-no question for which the two outcomes
      are equally probable.
  
      2. [techspeak] A computational quantity that can take on one of two values,
      such as true and false or 0 and 1.
  
      3. A mental flag: a reminder that something should be done eventually. ?I
      have a bit set for you.? (I haven't seen you for a while, and I'm supposed
      to tell or ask you something.)
  
      4. More generally, a (possibly incorrect) mental state of belief. ?I have a
      bit set that says that you were the last guy to hack on EMACS.? (Meaning ?I
      think you were the last guy to hack on EMACS, and what I am about to say is
      predicated on this, so please stop me if this isn't true.?) ?I just need
      one bit from you? is a polite way of indicating that you intend only a
      short interruption for a question that can presumably be answered yes or
      no.
  
      A bit is said to be set if its value is true or 1, and reset or clear if
      its value is false or 0. One speaks of setting and clearing bits. To {
      toggle or invert a bit is to change it, either from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0.
      See also flag, trit, mode bit.
  
      The term bit first appeared in print in the computer-science sense in a
      1948 paper by information theorist Claude Shannon, and was there credited
      to the early computer scientist John Tukey (who also seems to have coined
      the term software). Tukey records that bit evolved over a lunch table as a
      handier alternative to bigit or binit, at a conference in the winter of
      1943-44.
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  bit
  
      (b) binary digit.
  
     The unit of information; the amount of information obtained by
     asking a yes-or-no question; a computational quantity that can
     take on one of two values, such as false and true or 0 and 1;
     the smallest unit of storage - sufficient to hold one bit.
  
     A bit is said to be "set" if its value is true or 1, and
     "reset" or "clear" if its value is false or 0.  One speaks of
     setting and clearing bits.  To toggle or "invert" a bit is
     to change it, either from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0.
  
     The term "bit" first appeared in print in the computer-science
     sense in 1949, and seems to have been coined by the eminent
     statistician, John Tukey.  Tukey records that it evolved
     over a lunch table as a handier alternative to "bigit" or
     "binit".
  
     See also flag, trit, mode bit, byte, word.
  
     [{Jargon File]
  
     (2002-01-22)
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Bit
     the curb put into the mouths of horses to restrain them. The
     Hebrew word (metheg) so rendered in Ps. 32:9 is elsewhere
     translated "bridle" (2 Kings 19:28; Prov. 26:3; Isa. 37:29).
     Bits were generally made of bronze or iron, but sometimes also
     of gold or silver. In James 3:3 the Authorized Version
     translates the Greek word by "bits," but the Revised Version by
     "bridles."
     

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