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4 definitions found
 for blue devils
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Devil \Dev"il\, n. [AS. de['o]fol, de['o]ful; akin to G. ?eufel,
     Goth. diaba['u]lus; all fr. L. diabolus the devil, Gr. ? the
     devil, the slanderer, fr. ? to slander, calumniate, orig., to
     throw across; ? across + ? to throw, let fall, fall; cf. Skr.
     gal to fall. Cf. Diabolic.]
     1. The Evil One; Satan, represented as the tempter and
        spiritual of mankind.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              [Jesus] being forty days tempted of the devil.
                                                    --Luke iv. 2.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              That old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which
              deceiveth the whole world.            --Rev. xii. 9.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. An evil spirit; a demon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A dumb man possessed with a devil.    --Matt. ix.
                                                    32.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. A very wicked person; hence, any great evil. "That devil
        Glendower." "The devil drunkenness." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a
              devil?                                --John vi. 70.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. An expletive of surprise, vexation, or emphasis, or,
        ironically, of negation. [Low]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The devil a puritan that he is, . . . but a
              timepleaser.                          --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare,
              But wonder how the devil they got there. --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. (Cookery) A dish, as a bone with the meat, broiled and
        excessively peppered; a grill with Cayenne pepper.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Men and women busy in baking, broiling, roasting
              oysters, and preparing devils on the gridiron. --Sir
                                                    W. Scott.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. (Manuf.) A machine for tearing or cutting rags, cotton,
        etc.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Blue devils. See under Blue.
  
     Cartesian devil. See under Cartesian.
  
     Devil bird (Zool.), one of two or more South African drongo
        shrikes ({Edolius retifer, and Edolius remifer),
        believed by the natives to be connected with sorcery.
  
     Devil may care, reckless, defiant of authority; -- used
        adjectively. --Longfellow.
  
     Devil's apron (Bot.), the large kelp ({Laminaria
        saccharina, and Laminaria longicruris) of the Atlantic
        ocean, having a blackish, leathery expansion, shaped
        somewhat like an apron.
  
     Devil's coachhorse. (Zool.)
        (a) The black rove beetle ({Ocypus olens). [Eng.]
        (b) A large, predacious, hemipterous insect ({Prionotus
            cristatus); the wheel bug. [U.S.]
  
     Devil's darning-needle. (Zool.) See under Darn, v. t.
  
     Devil's fingers, Devil's hand (Zool.), the common British
        starfish ({Asterias rubens); -- also applied to a sponge
        with stout branches. [Prov. Eng., Irish & Scot.]
  
     Devil's riding-horse (Zool.), the American mantis ({Mantis
        Carolina).
  
     The Devil's tattoo, a drumming with the fingers or feet.
        "Jack played the Devil's tattoo on the door with his boot
        heels." --F. Hardman (Blackw. Mag.).
  
     Devil worship, worship of the power of evil; -- still
        practiced by barbarians who believe that the good and evil
        forces of nature are of equal power.
  
     Printer's devil, the youngest apprentice in a printing
        office, who runs on errands, does dirty work (as washing
        the ink rollers and sweeping), etc. "Without fearing the
        printer's devil or the sheriff's officer." --Macaulay.
  
     Tasmanian devil (Zool.), a very savage carnivorous
        marsupial of Tasmania ({Dasyurus ursinus syn. Diabolus
        ursinus).
  
     To play devil with, to molest extremely; to ruin. [Low]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Blue \Blue\ (bl[=u]), a. [Compar. Bluer (bl[=u]"[~e]r);
     superl. Bluest.] [OE. bla, blo, blew, blue, livid, black,
     fr. Icel.bl[=a]r livid; akin to Dan. blaa blue, Sw. bl[*a],
     D. blauw, OHG. bl[=a]o, G. blau; but influenced in form by F.
     bleu, from OHG. bl[=a]o.]
     1. Having the color of the clear sky, or a hue resembling it,
        whether lighter or darker; as, the deep, blue sea; as blue
        as a sapphire; blue violets. "The blue firmament."
        --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Pale, without redness or glare, -- said of a flame; hence,
        of the color of burning brimstone, betokening the presence
        of ghosts or devils; as, the candle burns blue; the air
        was blue with oaths.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Low in spirits; melancholy; as, to feel blue.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Suited to produce low spirits; gloomy in prospect; as,
        thongs looked blue. [Colloq.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. Severe or over strict in morals; gloom; as, blue and sour
        religionists; suiting one who is over strict in morals;
        inculcating an impracticable, severe, or gloomy mortality;
        as, blue laws.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. Literary; -- applied to women; -- an abbreviation of
        bluestocking. [Colloq.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The ladies were very blue and well informed.
                                                    --Thackeray.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Blue asbestus. See Crocidolite.
  
     Blue black, of, or having, a very dark blue color, almost
        black.
  
     Blue blood. See under Blood.
  
     Blue buck (Zool.), a small South African antelope
        ({Cephalophus pygm[ae]us); also applied to a larger
        species ({[AE]goceras leucoph[ae]us); the blaubok.
  
     Blue cod (Zool.), the buffalo cod.
  
     Blue crab (Zool.), the common edible crab of the Atlantic
        coast of the United States ({Callinectes hastatus).
  
     Blue curls (Bot.), a common plant ({Trichostema
        dichotomum), resembling pennyroyal, and hence called also
        bastard pennyroyal.
  
     Blue devils, apparitions supposed to be seen by persons
        suffering with delirium tremens; hence, very low
        spirits. "Can Gumbo shut the hall door upon blue devils,
        or lay them all in a red sea of claret?" --Thackeray.
  
     Blue gage. See under Gage, a plum.
  
     Blue gum, an Australian myrtaceous tree ({Eucalyptus
        globulus), of the loftiest proportions, now cultivated in
        tropical and warm temperate regions for its timber, and as
        a protection against malaria. The essential oil is
        beginning to be used in medicine. The timber is very
        useful. See Eucalyptus.
  
     Blue jack, Blue stone, blue vitriol; sulphate of copper.
        
  
     Blue jacket, a man-of war's man; a sailor wearing a naval
        uniform.
  
     Blue jaundice. See under Jaundice.
  
     Blue laws, a name first used in the eighteenth century to
        describe certain supposititious laws of extreme rigor
        reported to have been enacted in New Haven; hence, any
        puritanical laws. [U. S.]
  
     Blue light, a composition which burns with a brilliant blue
        flame; -- used in pyrotechnics and as a night signal at
        sea, and in military operations.
  
     Blue mantle (Her.), one of the four pursuivants of the
        English college of arms; -- so called from the color of
        his official robes.
  
     Blue mass, a preparation of mercury from which is formed
        the blue pill. --McElrath.
  
     Blue mold or Blue mould, the blue fungus ({Aspergillus
        glaucus) which grows on cheese. --Brande & C.
  
     Blue Monday,
        (a) a Monday following a Sunday of dissipation, or itself
            given to dissipation (as the Monday before Lent).
        (b) a Monday considered as depressing because it is a
            workday in contrast to the relaxation of the weekend.
            
  
     Blue ointment (Med.), mercurial ointment.
  
     Blue Peter (British Marine), a blue flag with a white
        square in the center, used as a signal for sailing, to
        recall boats, etc. It is a corruption of blue repeater,
        one of the British signal flags.
  
     Blue pill. (Med.)
        (a) A pill of prepared mercury, used as an aperient, etc.
        (b) Blue mass.
  
     Blue ribbon.
        (a) The ribbon worn by members of the order of the Garter;
            -- hence, a member of that order.
        (b) Anything the attainment of which is an object of great
            ambition; a distinction; a prize. "These
            [scholarships] were the --blue ribbon of the college."
            --Farrar.
        (c) The distinctive badge of certain temperance or total
            abstinence organizations, as of the --Blue ribbon
            Army.
  
     Blue ruin, utter ruin; also, gin. [Eng. Slang] --Carlyle.
  
     Blue spar (Min.), azure spar; lazulite. See Lazulite.
  
     Blue thrush (Zool.), a European and Asiatic thrush
        ({Petrocossyphus cyaneas).
  
     Blue verditer. See Verditer.
  
     Blue vitriol (Chem.), sulphate of copper, a violet blue
        crystallized salt, used in electric batteries, calico
        printing, etc.
  
     Blue water, the open ocean.
  
     Big Blue, the International Business Machines corporation.
        [Wall Street slang.] PJC
  
     To look blue, to look disheartened or dejected.
  
     True blue, genuine and thorough; not modified, nor mixed;
        not spurious; specifically, of uncompromising
        Presbyterianism, blue being the color adopted by the
        Covenanters.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              For his religion . . .
              'T was Presbyterian, true blue.       --Hudibras.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  blue devils
      n 1: a state of depression; "he had a bad case of the blues"
           [syn: blues, blue devils, megrims, vapors,
           vapours]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  26 Moby Thesaurus words for "blue devils":
     blahs, blue Johnnies, blues, dismals, dods, doldrums, dolefuls,
     dorts, dumps, frumps, grumps, megrims, mopes, mulligrubs, mumps,
     pink elephants, pink spiders, pouts, snakes, sulks, sullens,
     the beezie-weezies, the heebie-jeebies, the jimjams,
     the screaming meemies, the shakes
  
  

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