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2 definitions found
 for calicoback
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Calico \Cal"i*co\, n.; pl. Calicoes. [So called because first
     imported from Calicut, in the East Indies: cf. F. calicot.]
     1. Plain white cloth made from cotton, but which receives
        distinctive names according to quality and use, as, super
        calicoes, shirting calicoes, unbleached calicoes, etc.
        [Eng.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The importation of printed or stained colicoes
              appears to have been coeval with the establishment
              of the East India Company.            --Beck
                                                    (Draper's
                                                    Dict. ).
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Cotton cloth printed with a figured pattern.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: In the United States the term calico is applied only to
           the printed fabric.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     Calico bass (Zool.), an edible, fresh-water fish ({Pomoxys
        sparaides) of the rivers and lake of the Western United
        States (esp. of the Misissippi valley.), allied to the
        sunfishes, and so called from its variegated colors; --
        called also calicoback, grass bass, strawberry bass,
        barfish, and bitterhead.
  
     Calico printing, the art or process of impressing the
        figured patterns on calico.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Calicoback \Cal"i*co*back`\, n. (Zool.)
     (a) The calico bass.
     (b) An hemipterous insect ({Murgantia histrionica) which
         injures the cabbage and other garden plants; -- called
         also calico bug and harlequin cabbage bug.
         [1913 Webster] Calicular

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