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4 definitions found
 for crud
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Crud \Crud\ (kr?d), n.
     See Curd. [Obs.]
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Curd \Curd\ (k[^u]rd), n. [Of Celtic origin; cf. Gael. gruth,
     Ir, gruth, cruth, curd, cruthaim I milk.] [Sometimes written
     crud.]
     1. The coagulated or thickened part of milk, as distinguished
        from the whey, or watery part. It is eaten as food,
        especially when made into cheese.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Curds and cream, the flower of country fare.
                                                    --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The coagulated part of any liquid.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. The edible flower head of certain brassicaceous plants, as
        the broccoli and cauliflower.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Broccoli should be cut while the curd, as the
              flowering mass is termed, is entire.  --R. Thompson.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Cauliflowers should be cut for use while the head,
              or curd, is still close and compact.  --F. Burr.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  crud
      n 1: heavy wet snow that is unsuitable for skiing
      2: any substance considered disgustingly foul or unpleasant
         [syn: filth, crud, skank]
      3: an ill-defined bodily ailment; "he said he had the crud and
         needed a doctor"

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  CRUD
  
      A mnemonic for the four most important
     kinds of activity that almost any system of any type needs to
     support: create, read, update, delete.  The absence or failure of
     any one of these is often a sign of a bad design or poor testing.
  
     (2014-08-06)
  

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