dict.org

The DICT Development Group


Search for:
Search type:
Database:

Database copyright information
Server information
Wiki: Resources, links, and other information


4 definitions found
 for email
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  E-mail \E-mail\, email \email\, e-mail \e-mail\([=e]"m[^a]l`),
     n.
     electronic mail; a digitally encoded message sent from one
     computer to another through an electronic communications
     medium, especially by means of a computer network.
  
     Syn: electronic mail.
          [PJC] email
          E-mail

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  E-mail \E-mail\, email \email\, e-mail \e-mail\v. t. [imp. & p.
     p. E-mailed; p. pr. & vb. n. E-mailing.]
     to send (an e-mail message) to someone; as, I emailed the
     article to the editor; she emailed me her report.
  
     Syn: mail electronically.
          [WordNet 1.5]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  email
      n 1: (computer science) a system of world-wide electronic
           communication in which a computer user can compose a
           message at one terminal that can be regenerated at the
           recipient's terminal when the recipient logs in; "you
           cannot send packages by electronic mail" [syn: electronic
           mail, e-mail, email] [ant: snail mail]
      v 1: communicate electronically on the computer; "she e-mailed
           me the good news" [syn: e-mail, email, netmail]

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  email
   /ee'mayl/
  
      (also written ?e-mail? and ?E-mail?)
  
      1. n. Electronic mail automatically passed through computer networks and/or
      via modems over common-carrier lines. Contrast snail-mail, paper-net, {
      voice-net. See network address.
  
      2. vt. To send electronic mail.
  
      Oddly enough, the word emailed is actually listed in the OED; it means ?
      embossed (with a raised pattern) or perh. arranged in a net or open work?.
      A use from 1480 is given. The word is probably derived from French ?maill?
      (enameled) and related to Old French emmaille?re (network). A French
      correspondent tells us that in modern French, ?email? is a hard enamel
      obtained by heating special paints in a furnace; an ?emailleur? (no final
      e) is a craftsman who makes email (he generally paints some objects (like,
      say, jewelry) and cooks them in a furnace).
  
      There are numerous spelling variants of this word. In Internet traffic up
      to 1995, ?email? predominates, ?e-mail? runs a not-too-distant second, and
      ?E-mail? and ?Email? are a distant third and fourth.
  

Questions or comments about this site? Contact webmaster@dict.org