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7 definitions found
 for fir
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Pine \Pine\, n. [AS. p[imac]n, L. pinus.]
     1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See
        Pinus.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United
           white+pine+({Pinus+Strobus">States, of which the white pine ({Pinus Strobus),
           Georgia+pine+({Pinus+australis">the Georgia pine ({Pinus australis), the red pine
           ({Pinus resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar
           pine ({Pinus Lambertiana}) are among the most
           valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called
           Norway+or+Riga+pine+({Pinus+sylvestris">Norway or Riga pine ({Pinus sylvestris), is the
           only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree,
           or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See
           Pinon.
           [1913 Webster] The spruces, firs, larches, and true
           cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now
           commonly assigned to other genera.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The wood of the pine tree.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. A pineapple.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground.
  
     Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree,
        the Araucaria excelsa.
  
     Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered
        with pines. [Southern U.S.]
  
     Pine borer (Zool.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into
        pine trees.
  
     Pine finch. (Zool.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary.
  
     Pine grosbeak (Zool.), a large grosbeak ({Pinicola
        enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both
        hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with
        red.
  
     Pine lizard (Zool.), a small, very active, mottled gray
        lizard ({Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle
        States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and
        alligator.
  
     Pine marten. (Zool.)
        (a) A European weasel ({Mustela martes), called also
            sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten.
        (b) The American sable. See Sable.
  
     Pine moth (Zool.), any one of several species of small
        tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae]
        burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often
        doing great damage.
  
     Pine mouse (Zool.), an American wild mouse ({Arvicola
        pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine
        forests.
  
     Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves
        of a pine tree. See Pinus.
  
     Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below).
  
     Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir
        and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors.
        
  
     Pine snake (Zool.), a large harmless North American snake
        ({Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with
        brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull
        snake. The Western pine snake ({Pituophis Sayi}) is
        chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange.
  
     Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine.
  
     Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the
        seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a
        figure of a pine tree. The most noted variety is the pine
        tree shilling.
  
     Pine weevil (Zool.), any one of numerous species of weevils
        whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several
        species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to
        the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc.
  
     Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming
        them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the
        Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic
        arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood
        wool.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Fir \Fir\ (f[~e]r), n. [Dan. fyr, fyrr; akin to Sw. furu, Icel.
     fura, AS. furh in furhwudu fir wood, G. f["o]hre, OHG. forha
     pine, vereheih a sort of oak, L. quercus oak.] (Bot.)
     A genus ({Abies) of coniferous trees, often of large size
     and elegant shape, some of them valued for their timber and
     others for their resin. The species are distinguished as the
     balsam fir, the silver fir, the red fir, etc. The
     Scotch fir is a Pinus.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Fir in the Bible means any one of several coniferous
           trees, including, cedar, cypress, and probably three
           species of pine. --J. D. Hooker.
           [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  fir
      n 1: nonresinous wood of a fir tree
      2: any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of
         upland areas [syn: fir, fir tree, true fir]

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014) :

  FIR
         Finite Impulse Response (DSP)
         

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014) :

  FIR
         Fast IRDA (IRDA)
         

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  FIR
  
     1.  Finite Impulse Response (filter).
  
     2.  Fast Infrared.  Infrared standard from IrDA,
     part of IrDA Data.  FIR supports synchronous
     communications at 4 Mbps (and 1.115 Mbps?), at a distance of
     up to 1 metre.
  
     (1999-10-14)
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Fir
     the uniform rendering in the Authorized Version (marg. R.V.,
     "cypress") of _berosh_ (2 Sam. 6:5; 1 Kings 5:8, 10; 6:15, 34;
     9:11, etc.), a lofty tree (Isa. 55:13) growing on Lebanon
     (37:24). Its wood was used in making musical instruments and
     doors of houses, and for ceilings (2 Chr. 3:5), the decks of
     ships (Ezek. 27:5), floorings and spear-shafts (Nah. 2:3, R.V.).
     The true fir (abies) is not found in Palestine, but the pine
     tree, of which there are four species, is common.
     
       The precise kind of tree meant by the "green fir tree" (Hos.
     14:8) is uncertain. Some regard it as the sherbin tree, a
     cypress resembling the cedar; others, the Aleppo or maritime
     pine (Pinus halepensis), which resembles the Scotch fir; while
     others think that the "stone-pine" (Pinus pinea) is probably
     meant. (See PINE.)
     

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