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5 definitions found
 for gargoyle
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Gargoyle \Gar"goyle\, n. [OE. garguilie, gargouille, cf. Sp.
     g['a]rgola, prob. fr. the same source as F. gorge throat,
     influenced by L. gargarizare to gargle. See Gorge and cf.
     Gargle, Gargarize.] (Arch.)
     A spout projecting from the roof gutter of a building, often
     carved grotesquely. [Written also gargle, gargyle, and
     gurgoyle.]
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  gargoyle
      n 1: a spout that terminates in a grotesquely carved figure of a
           person or animal
      2: an ornament consisting of a grotesquely carved figure of a
         person or animal

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  22 Moby Thesaurus words for "gargoyle":
     baboon, bag, beak, blemish, blot, dog, downspout, eyesore, fright,
     hag, harridan, mess, monster, monstrosity, no beauty, scarecrow,
     sight, spout, teratism, ugly duckling, waterspout, witch
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  Gargoyle
  
     A language for compiler writing.
  
     [J.V. Garwick, CACM 7(1):16-20, (Jan 1964)].
  
     (1994-11-04)
  

From The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906) :

  GARGOYLE, n.  A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval
  buildings, commonly fashioned into a grotesque caricature of some
  personal enemy of the architect or owner of the building.  This was
  especially the case in churches and ecclesiastical structures
  generally, in which the gargoyles presented a perfect rogues' gallery
  of local heretics and controversialists.  Sometimes when a new dean
  and chapter were installed the old gargoyles were removed and others
  substituted having a closer relation to the private animosities of the
  new incumbents.
  

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