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4 definitions found
 for irritated
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  irritated \irritated\ adj.
     aroused to impatience or anger; as, made an irritated
     gesture.
  
     Syn: annoyed, nettled, peeved, pissed, stung.
          [WordNet 1.5]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Irritate \Ir"ri*tate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Irritated; p. pr. &
     vb. n. Irritating.] [L. irritatus, p. p. of irritare. Of
     doubtful origin.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. To increase the action or violence of; to heighten
        excitement in; to intensify; to stimulate.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Cold maketh the spirits vigorous and irritateth
              them.                                 --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To excite anger or displeasure in; to provoke; to tease;
        to exasperate; to annoy; to vex; as, the insolence of a
        tyrant irritates his subjects.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Dismiss the man, nor irritate the god:
              Prevent the rage of him who reigns above. --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Physiol.) To produce irritation in; to stimulate; to
        cause to contract. See Irritation, n., 2.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Med.) To make morbidly excitable, or oversensitive; to
        fret; as, the skin is irritated by friction; to irritate a
        wound by a coarse bandage.
  
     Syn: To fret; inflame; excite; provoke; tease; vex;
          exasperate; anger; incense; enrage.
  
     Usage: To Irritate, Provoke, Exasperate. These words
            express different stages of excited or angry feeling.
            Irritate denotes an excitement of quick and slightly
            angry feeling which is only momentary; as, irritated
            by a hasty remark. To provoke implies the awakening of
            some open expression of decided anger; as, a provoking
            insult. Exasperate denotes a provoking of anger at
            something unendurable. Whatever comes across our
            feelings irritates; whatever excites anger provokes;
            whatever raises anger to a high point exasperates.
            "Susceptible and nervous people are most easily
            irritated; proud people are quickly provoked; hot and
            fiery people are soonest exasperated." --Crabb.
            [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  irritated
      adj 1: aroused to impatience or anger; "made an irritated
             gesture"; "feeling nettled from the constant teasing";
             "peeved about being left out"; "felt really pissed at her
             snootiness"; "riled no end by his lies"; "roiled by the
             delay" [syn: annoyed, irritated, miffed, nettled,
             peeved, pissed, pissed off, riled, roiled,
             steamed, stung]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  91 Moby Thesaurus words for "irritated":
     aggravated, algetic, amplified, angry, annoyed, augmented,
     bothered, broken, browned-off, bugged, burned, burning, burnt-up,
     burst, busted, chafed, checked, chipped, cracked, crazed, cut,
     damaged, deliberately provoked, deteriorated, disturbed,
     embittered, enhanced, enlarged, exacerbated, exasperated,
     festering, fiery, galled, griped, harmed, heated up, heightened,
     hotted up, huffy, hurt, impaired, imperfect, in bits, in pieces,
     in shards, increased, inflamed, injured, intensified, irked,
     lacerated, magnified, mangled, miffed, mutilated, nettled, peeved,
     piqued, provoked, put-out, rankling, raw, red, rent, resentful,
     riled, roiled, ruffled, ruptured, scalded, scorched, sensitive,
     shattered, slashed, slit, smarting, smashed, sore, soured, split,
     sprung, tender, the worse for, tingling, torn, troubled, vexed,
     weakened, worse, worse off, worsened
  
  

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