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5 definitions found
 for logical
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Logical \Log"ic*al\ (l[o^]j"[i^]*kal), a. [Cf. F. logique, L.
     logicus, Gr. logiko`s.]
     1. Of or pertaining to logic; used in logic; as, logical
        subtilties. --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. According to the rules of logic; as, a logical argument or
        inference; the reasoning is logical; a logical argument; a
        logical impossibility. --Prior.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Skilled in logic; versed in the art of thinking and
        reasoning; as, he is a logical thinker. --Addison.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  logical
      adj 1: capable of or reflecting the capability for correct and
             valid reasoning; "a logical mind" [ant: illogical,
             unlogical]
      2: based on known statements or events or conditions; "rain was
         a logical expectation, given the time of year" [syn:
         legitimate, logical]
      3: marked by an orderly, logical, and aesthetically consistent
         relation of parts; "a coherent argument" [syn: coherent,
         consistent, logical, ordered] [ant: incoherent]
      4: capable of thinking and expressing yourself in a clear and
         consistent manner; "a lucid thinker"; "she was more coherent
         than she had been just after the accident" [syn: coherent,
         logical, lucid]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  49 Moby Thesaurus words for "logical":
     admissible, authoritative, balanced, binding, cogent, coherent,
     commonsense, consistent, cool, coolheaded, credible, deductive,
     good, inductive, inferential, intelligent, judicious, just,
     justifiable, lawful, legal, legitimate, levelheaded, philosophical,
     plausible, practical, pragmatic, proper, rational, reasonable,
     sane, self-consistent, sensible, sober, sober-minded, sound,
     substantial, sufficient, syllogistical, valid, weighty,
     well-argued, well-balanced, well-founded, well-grounded,
     well-reasoned, well-thought-out, wholesome, wise
  
  

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  logical
   adj.
  
      [from the technical term logical device, wherein a physical device is
      referred to by an arbitrary ?logical? name] Having the role of. If a person
      (say, Les Earnest at SAIL) who had long held a certain post left and were
      replaced, the replacement would for a while be known as the logical Les
      Earnest. (This does not imply any judgment on the replacement.) Compare {
      virtual.
  
      At Stanford, ?logical? compass directions denote a coordinate system
      relative to El Camino Real, in which ?logical north? is always toward San
      Francisco and ?logical south? is always toward San Jose--in spite of the
      fact that El Camino Real runs physical north/south near San Francisco,
      physical east/west near San Jose, and along a curve everywhere in between.
      (The best rule of thumb here is that, by definition, El Camino Real always
      runs logical north-south.)
  
      In giving directions, one might say: ?To get to Rincon Tarasco restaurant,
      get onto El Camino Bignum going logical north.? Using the word ?logical?
      helps to prevent the recipient from worrying about that the fact that the
      sun is setting almost directly in front of him. The concept is reinforced
      by North American highways which are almost, but not quite, consistently
      labeled with logical rather than physical directions. A similar situation
      exists at MIT: Route 128 (famous for the electronics industry that grew up
      along it) wraps roughly 3 quarters around Boston at a radius of 10 miles,
      terminating near the coastline at each end. It would be most precise to
      describe the two directions along this highway as ?clockwise? and
      ?counterclockwise?, but the road signs all say ?north? and ?south?,
      respectively. A hacker might describe these directions as logical north and
      logical south, to indicate that they are conventional directions not
      corresponding to the usual denotation for those words.
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  logical
  
     (From the technical term "logical device", wherein a physical
     device is referred to by an arbitrary "logical" name) Having
     the role of.  If a person (say, Les Earnest at SAIL) who had
     long held a certain post left and were replaced, the
     replacement would for a while be known as the "logical" Les
     Earnest.  (This does not imply any judgment on the
     replacement).
  
     Compare virtual.
  
     At Stanford, "logical" compass directions denote a coordinate
     system in which "logical north" is toward San Francisco,
     "logical west" is toward the ocean, etc., even though logical
     north varies between physical (true) north near San Francisco
     and physical west near San Jose.  (The best rule of thumb here
     is that, by definition, El Camino Real always runs logical
     north-and-south.)  In giving directions, one might say: "To
     get to Rincon Tarasco restaurant, get onto El Camino Bignum
     going logical north."  Using the word "logical" helps to
     prevent the recipient from worrying about that the fact that
     the sun is setting almost directly in front of him.  The
     concept is reinforced by North American highways which are
     almost, but not quite, consistently labelled with logical
     rather than physical directions.
  
     A similar situation exists at MIT: Route 128 (famous for the
     electronics industry that has grown up along it) is a
     3-quarters circle surrounding Boston at a radius of 10 miles,
     terminating near the coastline at each end.  It would be most
     precise to describe the two directions along this highway as
     "clockwise" and "counterclockwise", but the road signs all say
     "north" and "south", respectively.  A hacker might describe
     these directions as "logical north" and "logical south", to
     indicate that they are conventional directions not
     corresponding to the usual denotation for those words.  (If
     you went logical south along the entire length of route 128,
     you would start out going northwest, curve around to the
     south, and finish headed due east, passing along one infamous
     stretch of pavement that is simultaneously route 128 south and
     Interstate 93 north, and is signed as such!)
  
     [{Jargon File]
  
     (1995-01-24)
  

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