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7 definitions found
 for macro
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  macro \macro\ a.
     very large in scale or scope or capability; as,
     macroeconomics.
     [WordNet 1.5]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Macro- \Mac"ro-\pref. [Gr. makro`s, adj.]
     A combining form signifying long, large, great; as
     macrodiagonal, macrospore, macromolecule, macrocosm.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  macro \macro\ n. [shortened form of macroinstruction]
     1. a single computer instruction which symbolizes, and is
        converted at the time of program execution or by a
        compiler into, a series of instructions in the same
        computer language.
        [WordNet 1.5]
  
     2. A keystroke (or combination of keystrokes) which
        symbolizes and is replaced by a series of keystrokes; -- a
        convenient feature of some advanced programs, such as word
        processors or database programs, which allows a user to
        rapidly execute any series of operations which may be
        performed multiple times. Such macros may typically be
        defined by the program user, without rewriting or
        recompiling the program.
        [PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  macro
      adj 1: very large in scale or scope or capability
      n 1: a single computer instruction that results in a series of
           instructions in machine language [syn: macro, macro
           instruction]

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  macro
   /mak'roh/, n.
  
      [techspeak] A name (possibly followed by a formal arg list) that is
      equated to a text or symbolic expression to which it is to be expanded
      (possibly with the substitution of actual arguments) by a macro expander.
      This definition can be found in any technical dictionary; what those won't
      tell you is how the hackish connotations of the term have changed over
      time.
  
      The term macro originated in early assemblers, which encouraged the use of
      macros as a structuring and information-hiding device. During the early
      1970s, macro assemblers became ubiquitous, and sometimes quite as powerful
      and expensive as HLLs, only to fall from favor as improving compiler
      technology marginalized assembler programming (see languages of choice).
      Nowadays the term is most often used in connection with the C preprocessor,
      LISP, or one of several special-purpose languages built around a
      macro-expansion facility (such as TeX or Unix's [nt]roff suite).
  
      Indeed, the meaning has drifted enough that the collective macros is now
      sometimes used for code in any special-purpose application control language
      (whether or not the language is actually translated by text expansion), and
      for macro-like entities such as the keyboard macros supported in some text
      editors (and PC TSR or Macintosh INIT/CDEV keyboard enhancers).
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  MACRO
  
     1. Assembly language for VAX/VMS.
  
     2. PL/I-like language with extensions for string processing.
     "MACRO: A Programming Language", S.R. Greenwood, SIGPLAN
     Notices 14(9):80-91 (Sep 1979).
  
     [{Jargon File]
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  macro
  
     A name (possibly followed by a formal argument list) that is
     equated to a text or symbolic expression to which it is to be
     expanded (possibly with the substitution of actual
     arguments) by a macro expander.
  
     The term "macro" originated in early assemblers, which
     encouraged the use of macros as a structuring and
     information-hiding device.  During the early 1970s, macro
     assemblers became ubiquitous, and sometimes quite as powerful
     and expensive as HLLs, only to fall from favour as improving
     compiler technology marginalised assembly language
     programming (see languages of choice).  Nowadays the term is
     most often used in connection with the C preprocessor,
     Lisp, or one of several special-purpose languages built
     around a macro-expansion facility (such as TeX or Unix's
     troff suite).
  
     Indeed, the meaning has drifted enough that the collective
     "macros" is now sometimes used for code in any special-purpose
     application control language (whether or not the language is
     actually translated by text expansion), and for macro-like
     entities such as the "keyboard macros" supported in some text
     editors (and PC TSRs or Macintosh INIT/CDEV keyboard
     enhancers).
  
     (1994-12-06)
  

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