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11 definitions found
 for minister
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Minister \Min"is*ter\, n. [OE. ministre, F. ministre, fr. L.
     minister, orig. a double comparative from the root of minor
     less, and hence meaning, an inferior, a servant. See 1st
     Minor, and cf. Master, Minstrel.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. A servant; a subordinate; an officer or assistant of
        inferior rank; hence, an agent, an instrument.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Moses rose up, and his minister Joshua. --Ex. xxiv.
                                                    13.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I chose
              Camillo for the minister, to poison
              My friend Polixenes.                  --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. An officer of justice. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I cry out the on the ministres, quod he,
              That shoulde keep and rule this cit['e]. --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. One to whom the sovereign or executive head of a
        government intrusts the management of affairs of state, or
        some department of such affairs.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Ministers to kings, whose eyes, ears, and hands they
              are, must be answerable to God and man. --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. A representative of a government, sent to the court, or
        seat of government, of a foreign nation to transact
        diplomatic business.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Ambassadors are classed (in the diplomatic sense) in
           the first rank of public ministers, ministers
           plenipotentiary in the second. "The United States
           diplomatic service employs two classes of ministers, --
           ministers plenipotentiary and ministers resident."
           --Abbott.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     5. One who serves at the altar; one who performs sacerdotal
        duties; the pastor of a church duly authorized or licensed
        to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments.
        --Addison.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Delegate; official; ambassador; clergyman; parson;
          priest.
          [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Minister \Min"is*ter\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ministered; p. pr.
     & vb. n. Ministering.] [OE. ministren, OF. ministrer, fr.
     L. ministrare. See Minister, n.]
     To furnish or apply; to afford; to supply; to administer.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           He that ministereth seed to the sower.   --2 Cor. ix.
                                                    10.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           We minister to God reason to suspect us. --Jer. Taylor.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Minister \Min"is*ter\, v. i.
     1. To act as a servant, attendant, or agent; to attend and
        serve; to perform service in any office, sacred or
        secular.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but
              to minister.                          --Matt. xx.
                                                    28.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To supply or to things needful; esp., to supply
        consolation or remedies; as, to minister to the sick.
        --Matt. xxv. 44.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased? --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  minister
      n 1: a person authorized to conduct religious worship;
           "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant
           churches" [syn: curate, minister of religion,
           minister, parson, pastor, rector]
      2: a person appointed to a high office in the government;
         "Minister of Finance" [syn: minister, government
         minister]
      3: a diplomat representing one government to another; ranks
         below ambassador [syn: minister, diplomatic minister]
      4: the job of a head of a government department
      v 1: attend to the wants and needs of others; "I have to
           minister to my mother all the time"
      2: work as a minister; "She is ministering in an old parish"

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  130 Moby Thesaurus words for "minister":
     DD, Doctor of Divinity, Holy Joe, abbe, accommodate,
     administer the Eucharist, agent, aid, alderman, ambassador,
     ambassadress, anoint, apostolic delegate, archon, assist, attache,
     bailie, burghermaster, burgomaster, cabinet member,
     cabinet minister, care for, career diplomat, chancellor, chaplain,
     charge, chrism, churchman, city councilman, city father,
     city manager, clergyman, clergywoman, cleric, clerical, clerk,
     commercial attache, commissar, commissary, commissionaire,
     commissioner, confirm, consul, consul general, consular agent,
     councillor, councilman, councilwoman, county commissioner,
     county supervisor, curate, cure, dean, delegate, diplomat,
     diplomatic, diplomatic agent, diplomatist, divine, do duty,
     ecclesiastic, elder, emissary, envoy, envoy extraordinary,
     evangelist, father, foreign service officer, headman, help, herald,
     impose, induna, internuncio, lay hands on, legate, legislator,
     look after, lord mayor, magistrate, maire, man of God, mayor,
     messenger, military attache, military chaplain, minister of state,
     minister plenipotentiary, minister resident, minister to,
     missionary, nuncio, officiate, padre, parson, pastor,
     perform a rite, perform service, plenipotentiary, portreeve,
     preacher, priest, rector, reeve, resident, reverend, secretary,
     secretary of legation, secretary of state, see to, selectman,
     servant of God, serve, shepherd, sky pilot, supervisor, supply,
     supply clergy, supply minister, support, syndic, the Reverend,
     the very Reverend, tonsured cleric, undersecretary, vicar,
     vice-consul, vice-legate, wait on, warden
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Minister
     one who serves, as distinguished from the master. (1.) Heb.
     meshereth, applied to an attendant on one of superior rank, as
     to Joshua, the servant of Moses (Ex. 33:11), and to the servant
     of Elisha (2 Kings 4:43). This name is also given to attendants
     at court (2 Chr. 22:8), and to the priests and Levites (Jer.
     33:21; Ezek. 44:11).
     
       (2.) Heb. pelah (Ezra 7:24), a "minister" of religion. Here
     used of that class of sanctuary servants called "Solomon's
     servants" in Ezra 2:55-58 and Neh. 7:57-60.
     
       (3.) Greek leitourgos, a subordinate public administrator, and
     in this sense applied to magistrates (Rom. 13:6). It is applied
     also to our Lord (Heb. 8:2), and to Paul in relation to Christ
     (Rom. 15:16).
     
       (4.) Greek hyperetes (literally, "under-rower"), a personal
     attendant on a superior, thus of the person who waited on the
     officiating priest in the synagogue (Luke 4:20). It is applied
     also to John Mark, the attendant on Paul and Barnabas (Acts
     13:5).
     
       (5.) Greek diaconos, usually a subordinate officer or
     assistant employed in relation to the ministry of the gospel, as
     to Paul and Apollos (1 Cor. 3:5), Tychicus (Eph. 6:21), Epaphras
     (Col. 1:7), Timothy (1 Thess. 3:2), and also to Christ (Rom.
     15:8).
     

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MINISTER, government. An officer who is placed near the sovereign, and is 
  invested with the administration of some one of the principal branches of 
  the government. 
       2. Ministers are responsible to the king or other supreme magistrate 
  who has appointed them. 4 Conn. 134. 
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MINISTER, international law. This is the general name given to public 
  functionaries who represent their country abroad, such as ambassadors, 
  (q.v.) envoys, (q.v.) and residents. (q.v.) A custom of recent origin has 
  introduced a new kind of ministers, without any particular determination of 
  character; these are simply called ministers, to indicate that they are 
  invested with the general character of a sovereign's mandatories, without 
  any particular assignment of rank or character. 
       2. The minister represents his government in a vague and indeterminate 
  manner, which cannot be equal to the first degree; and be possesses all the 
  rights essential to a public minister. 
       3. There are also ministers plenipotentiary, who, as they possess full 
  powers, are of much greater distinction than simple ministers. These also, 
  are without any particular attribution of rank and character, but by custom 
  are now placed immediately below the ambassador, or on a level with the 
  envoy extraordinary. Vattel, liv. 4, c. 6, Sec. 74; Kent, Com. 38; Merl. 
  Repert. h.t. sect. 1, n. 4. 
       4. Formerly no distinction was made in the different classes of public 
  ministers, but the modern usage of Europe introduced some distinctions in 
  this respect, which, on account of a want of precision, became the source of 
  controversy. To obviate these, the congress of Vienna, and that of Aix la 
  Chapelle, put an end to these disputes by classing ministers as follows: 1. 
  Ambassadors, and papal legates or nuncios. 2. Envoys, ministers, or others 
  accredited to sovereigns, (aupres des souverains). 3. Ministers resident, 
  accredited to sovereigns. 4. Charges d'Affaires, accredited to the minister 
  of foreign affairs. Recez du Congres de Vienne, du 19 Mars, 1815; Protocol 
  du Congres d' Aix la Chapelle, du 21 Novembre, 1818; Wheat, Intern. Law, pt. 
  3, c. Sec. 6. 
       5. The act of May 1, 1810, 2 Story's L. U. S. 1171, fixes a 
  compensation for public, ministers, as follows 
       Sec. 1. Be it enacted, &c. That the president of the United States 
  shall not allow to any minister plenipotentiary a greater sum than at the 
  rate of nine thousand dollars per annum, as a compensation for all his 
  personal services and expenses; nor to any charge des affaires, a greater 
  sum than at the rate of four thousand five hundred dollars per annum, as a 
  compensation for all his personal services and expenses, nor to the 
  secretary of any legation, or embassy to any foreign country, or secretary 
  of any  minister plenipotentiary, a greater sum than at the rate of two 
  thousand dollars per annum, as a compensation for all his personal services 
  and expenses; nor to any consul who shall be appointed to reside at Algiers, 
  a greater sum than at the rate of four thousand dollars per annum, as a 
  compensation for all his personal services and expenses; nor to any other 
  consul who shall be appointed to reside at any other of the states on the 
  coast of Barbary, a greater sum than at the rate of two thousand dollars per 
  annum, as a compensation for all his personal services and expenses; nor 
  shall there be appointed more than one consul for any one of the said 
  states: Provided, it shall be lawful for the president of the United States 
  to allow to a minister plenipotentiary, or charge des affaires, on going 
  from the United States to any foreign country, an outfit, which shall in no 
  case exceed one year's full salary of such minister or charge des affaires; 
  but no consul shall be allowed an outfit in any case whatever, any usage or 
  custom' to the contrary notwithstanding. 
       6.-Sec. 2. That to entitle any charge des affaires, or secretary of 
  any legation or embassy to any foreign country, or secretary of any minister 
  plenipotentiary, to the compensation hereinbefore provided, they shall, 
  respectively, be appointed by the president of the United States, by and 
  with the advice and consent of the senate; but in the recess of the senate, 
  the president is hereby authorized to make such appointments, which shall be 
  submitted to the senate at the next session thereafter, for their advice and 
  consent; and no compensation shall be allowed to any charge des affaires, or 
  any of the secretaries hereinbefore described, who shall not be appointed as 
  aforesaid: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to 
  authorize any appointment, of a secretary to a charge des affaires, or to 
  any consul residing on the Barbary coast; or to sanction any claim against 
  the United States for expenses incident to the same, any usage or custom to 
  the contrary notwithstanding. 
       7. The Act of August 6, 1842, sect. 9, directs, that the president of 
  the United States shall not allow to any minister, resident a greater sum 
  than at the rate of six thousand dollars per annum, as a compensation for 
  all his personal services and expenses: Provided, that it shall be lawful 
  for the president to allow to such minister resident, on going from the 
  United States to any foreign country, an outfit, which shall in no case 
  exceed one year's full salary of such minister resident. 
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MINISTER, eccl. law. One ordained by some church to preach the gospel. 
       2. Ministers are authorized in the United States, generally, to marry, 
  and are liable to fines and penalties for marrying minors contrary to the 
  local regulations. As to the right of ministers or parsons, see Am. Jur. No. 
  30, p. 268; Anth. Shep. Touch. 564; 2 Mass. R. 500; 10 Mass. R. 97; 14 Mass. 
  R. 333; 3 Fairf. R. 487. 
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MINISTER, mediator. An officer appointed by the government of one nation, 
  with the consent of two other nations, who have a matter in dispute, with a 
  view by his interference and good office to have such matter settled., 
  
  

From The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906) :

  MINISTER, n.  An agent of a higher power with a lower responsibility. 
  In diplomacy and officer sent into a foreign country as the visible
  embodiment of his sovereign's hostility.  His principal qualification
  is a degree of plausible inveracity next below that of an ambassador.
  

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