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5 definitions found
 for multitude
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Multitude \Mul"ti*tude\, n. [F. multitude, L. multitudo,
     multitudinis, fr. multus much, many; of unknown origin.]
     1. A great number of persons collected together; a numerous
        collection of persons; a crowd; an assembly.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with
              compassion on them.                   --Matt. ix.
                                                    36.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A great number of persons or things, regarded
        collectively; as, the book will be read by a multitude of
        people; the multitude of stars; a multitude of cares.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              It is a fault in a multitude of preachers, that they
              utterly neglect method in their harangues. --I.
                                                    Watts.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A multitude of flowers
              As countless as the stars on high.    --Longfellow.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. The state of being many; numerousness.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              They came as grasshoppers for multitude. --Judg. vi.
                                                    5.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     The multitude, the populace; the mass of men.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Throng; crowd; assembly; assemblage; commonalty; swarm;
          populace; vulgar. See Throng.
          [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  multitude
      n 1: a large indefinite number; "a battalion of ants"; "a
           multitude of TV antennas"; "a plurality of religions" [syn:
           battalion, large number, multitude, plurality,
           pack]
      2: a large gathering of people [syn: multitude, throng,
         concourse]
      3: the common people generally; "separate the warriors from the
         mass"; "power to the people" [syn: multitude, masses,
         mass, hoi polloi, people, the great unwashed]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  90 Moby Thesaurus words for "multitude":
     a mass of, a world of, abundance, acres, army, bags, barrels, bevy,
     bunch, bushel, cloud, cluster, clutter, cohue, copiousness,
     countlessness, covey, crowd, crush, deluge, flight, flock, flocks,
     flood, galaxy, hail, heap, hive, horde, host, ignobile vulgus, jam,
     large amount, legion, load, lots, many, many-headed multitude,
     mass, masses of, mob, mobile vulgus, mountain, much, muchness,
     nest, numbers, numerousness, ocean, oceans, pack, panoply, peck,
     plenitude, plenty, plurality, press, profusion, quantities,
     quantity, quite a few, rabble, rout, ruck, scores, sea, shoal,
     spate, superabundance, superfluity, swarm, the common herd,
     the crowd, the great unnumbered, the great unwashed, the herd,
     the hoi polloi, the horde, the majority, the many, the masses,
     the mob, the multitude, throng, tidy sum, tons, volume, world,
     worlds, worlds of
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  MULTITUDE. The meaning of this word is not very certain. By some it is said 
  that to make a multitude there must be ten persons at least, while others 
  contend that the law has not fixed any number. Co. Litt. 257. 
  
  

From The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906) :

  MULTITUDE, n.  A crowd; the source of political wisdom and virtue.  In
  a republic, the object of the statesman's adoration.  "In a multitude
  of counsellors there is wisdom," saith the proverb.  If many men of
  equal individual wisdom are wiser than any one of them, it must be
  that they acquire the excess of wisdom by the mere act of getting
  together.  Whence comes it?  Obviously from nowhere -- as well say
  that a range of mountains is higher than the single mountains
  composing it.  A multitude is as wise as its wisest member if it obey
  him; if not, it is no wiser than its most foolish.
  

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