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6 definitions found
 for rouse
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rouse \Rouse\ (rouz or rous), v. i. & t. [Perhaps the same word
     as rouse to start up, "buckle to."] (Naut.)
     To pull or haul strongly and all together, as upon a rope,
     without the assistance of mechanical appliances.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rouse \Rouse\ (rouz), n. [Cf. D. roes drunkeness, icel. r[=u]ss,
     Sw. rus, G. rauchen, and also E. rouse, v.t., rush, v.i. Cf.
     Row a disturbance.]
     1. A bumper in honor of a toast or health. [Obs.] --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A carousal; a festival; a drinking frolic.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Fill the cup, and fill the can,
              Have a rouse before the morn.         --Tennyson.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rouse \Rouse\, v. i.
     1. To get or start up; to rise. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Night's black agents to their preys do rouse.
                                                    --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To awake from sleep or repose.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Morpheus rouses from his bed.         --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To be exited to thought or action from a state of
        indolence or inattention.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rouse \Rouse\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Roused (rouzd); p. pr. &
     vb. n. Rousing.] [Probably of Scan. origin; cf. Sw. rusa to
     rush, Dan. ruse, AS. hre['o]san to fall, rush. Cf. Rush,
     v.]
     1. To cause to start from a covert or lurking place; as, to
        rouse a deer or other animal of the chase.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Like wild boars late roused out of the brakes.
                                                    --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Rouse the fleet hart, and cheer the opening hound.
                                                    --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To wake from sleep or repose; as, to rouse one early or
        suddenly.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To excite to lively thought or action from a state of
        idleness, languor, stupidity, or indifference; as, to
        rouse the faculties, passions, or emotions.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              To rouse up a people, the most phlegmatic of any in
              Christendom.                          --Atterbury.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To put in motion; to stir up; to agitate.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Blustering winds, which all night long
              Had roused the sea.                   --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. To raise; to make erect. [Obs.] --Spenser. Shak.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  rouse
      v 1: become active; "He finally bestirred himself" [syn:
           bestir, rouse]
      2: force or drive out; "The police routed them out of bed at 2
         A.M." [syn: rout out, drive out, force out, rouse]
      3: cause to be agitated, excited, or roused; "The speaker
         charged up the crowd with his inflammatory remarks" [syn:
         agitate, rouse, turn on, charge, commove, excite,
         charge up] [ant: calm, calm down, lull, quiet,
         quieten, still, tranquilize, tranquillise,
         tranquillize]
      4: cause to become awake or conscious; "He was roused by the
         drunken men in the street"; "Please wake me at 6 AM." [syn:
         awaken, wake, waken, rouse, wake up, arouse]
         [ant: cause to sleep]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  124 Moby Thesaurus words for "rouse":
     aggravate, animate, annoy, arise, arouse, awake, awaken, bestir,
     blow the coals, blow up, bring forth, bring out, bring to light,
     call, call forth, call out, call up, challenge, come alive, deduce,
     deepen, derive, drag out, draw forth, draw out, dynamize, educe,
     electrify, elicit, energize, enhance, enkindle, enliven, enrage,
     evoke, excite, exhilarate, fan, fan the fire, fan the flame,
     feed the fire, fire, fire up, flame, foment, frenzy, galvanize,
     get from, get out of, get up, goad, hearten, heat, heighten,
     impassion, incense, incite, induce, inflame, infuriate, inspirit,
     instigate, invigorate, jazz up, key up, kindle, knock up,
     lather up, light the fuse, light up, liven, madden, magnify,
     motivate, mount, move, obtain, overexcite, pep up, perk up, pique,
     procure, prod, prompt, provoke, quicken, raise, raise up, rally,
     redouble, rise, secure, set astir, set fire to, set on fire,
     shake up, snap up, steam up, stimulate, stir, stir the blood,
     stir the embers, stir the feelings, stir up, summon forth,
     summon up, turn on, vitalize, vivify, wake, wake up, waken, wangle,
     wangle out of, warm, warm the blood, whet, whip up, winkle out,
     work into, work up, worm out, worm out of, zip up
  
  

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