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4 definitions found
 for sea cat
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Sea catfish \Sea" cat`fish\ Sea cat \Sea" cat`\ (Zool.)
     (a) The wolf fish.
     (b) Any marine siluroid fish, as Aelurichthys marinus, and
         Arinus felis, of the eastern coast of the United
         States. Many species are found on the coasts of Central
         and South America.
         [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Seal \Seal\ (s[=e]l), n. [OE. sele, AS. seolh; akin to OHG.
     selah, Dan. sael, Sw. sj[aum]l, Icel. selr.] (Zool.)
     Any aquatic carnivorous mammal of the families Phocidae and
     Otariidae.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Seals inhabit seacoasts, and are found principally in
           the higher latitudes of both hemispheres. There are
           numerous species, bearing such popular names as sea
           lion, sea leopard, sea bear, or ursine seal,
           fur seal, and sea elephant. The bearded seal
           ({Erignathus barbatus), the hooded seal ({Cystophora
           cristata), and the ringed seal ({Phoca foetida}), are
           northern species. See also Eared seal, Harp seal,
           Monk seal, and Fur seal, under Eared, Harp,
           Monk, and Fur. Seals are much hunted for their
           skins and fur, and also for their oil, which in some
           species is very abundant.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     Harbor+seal+(Zool.),+the+common+seal+({Phoca+vitulina">Harbor seal (Zool.), the common seal ({Phoca vitulina). It
        inhabits both the North Atlantic and the North Pacific
        Ocean, and often ascends rivers; -- called also marbled
        seal, native seal, river seal, bay seal, land
        seal, sea calf, sea cat, sea dog, dotard,
        ranger, selchie, tangfish.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Weever \Wee"ver\, n. [Probably from F. vive, OF. vivre, a kind
     of fish, L. vipera viper. Cf. Viper.] (Zool.)
     Any one of several species of edible marine fishes belonging
     to the genus Trachinus, of the family Trachinidae. They
     have a broad spinose head, with the eyes looking upward. The
     long dorsal fin is supported by numerous strong, sharp spines
     which cause painful wounds.
     [1913 Webster]
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The two British species are the great, or greater,
           weever ({Trachinus draco), which becomes a foot long
           (called also gowdie, sea cat, stingbull, and
           weaverfish), and the lesser weever ({Trachinus
           vipera), about half as large (called also otter
           pike, and stingfish).
           [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Wolf \Wolf\, n.; pl. Wolves. [OE. wolf, wulf, AS. wulf; akin
     to OS. wulf, D. & G. wolf, Icel. [=u]lfr, Sw. ulf, Dan. ulv,
     Goth. wulfs, Lith. vilkas, Russ. volk', L. lupus, Gr. ly`kos,
     Skr. v[.r]ka; also to Gr. "e`lkein to draw, drag, tear in
     pieces. [root]286. Cf. Lupine, a., Lyceum.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. (Zool.) Any one of several species of wild and savage
        carnivores belonging to the genus Canis and closely
        allied to the common dog. The best-known and most
        destructive species are the European wolf ({Canis lupus),
        the American gray, or timber, wolf ({Canis occidentalis),
        and the prairie wolf, or coyote. Wolves often hunt in
        packs, and may thus attack large animals and even man.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. (Zool.) One of the destructive, and usually hairy, larvae
        of several species of beetles and grain moths; as, the bee
        wolf.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Fig.: Any very ravenous, rapacious, or destructive person
        or thing; especially, want; starvation; as, they toiled
        hard to keep the wolf from the door.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. A white worm, or maggot, which infests granaries.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. An eating ulcer or sore. Cf. Lupus. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              If God should send a cancer upon thy face, or a wolf
              into thy side.                        --Jer. Taylor.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. (Mus.)
        (a) The harsh, howling sound of some of the chords on an
            organ or piano tuned by unequal temperament.
        (b) In bowed instruments, a harshness due to defective
            vibration in certain notes of the scale.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     7. (Textile Manuf.) A willying machine. --Knight.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Black wolf. (Zool.)
        (a) A black variety of the European wolf which is common
            in the Pyrenees.
        (b) A black variety of the American gray wolf.
  
     Golden+wolf+(Zool.),+the+Thibetan+wolf+({Canis+laniger">Golden wolf (Zool.), the Thibetan wolf ({Canis laniger);
        -- called also chanco.
  
     Indian+wolf+(Zool.),+an+Asiatic+wolf+({Canis+pallipes">Indian wolf (Zool.), an Asiatic wolf ({Canis pallipes)
        which somewhat resembles a jackal. Called also landgak.
        
  
     Prairie wolf (Zool.), the coyote.
  
     Sea wolf. (Zool.) See in the Vocabulary.
  
     Strand wolf (Zool.) the striped hyena.
  
     Tasmanian wolf (Zool.), the zebra wolf.
  
     Tiger wolf (Zool.), the spotted hyena.
  
     To keep the wolf from the door, to keep away poverty; to
        prevent starvation. See Wolf, 3, above. --Tennyson.
  
     Wolf dog. (Zool.)
        (a) The mastiff, or shepherd dog, of the Pyrenees,
            supposed by some authors to be one of the ancestors of
            the St. Bernard dog.
        (b) The Irish greyhound, supposed to have been used
            formerly by the Danes for chasing wolves.
        (c) A dog bred between a dog and a wolf, as the Eskimo
            dog.
  
     Wolf eel (Zool.), a wolf fish.
  
     Wolf fish (Zool.), any one of several species of large,
        voracious marine fishes of the genus Anarrhichas,
        especially the common species ({Anarrhichas lupus) of
        Europe and North America. These fishes have large teeth
        and powerful jaws. Called also catfish, sea cat, sea
        wolf, stone biter, and swinefish.
  
     Wolf net, a kind of net used in fishing, which takes great
        numbers of fish.
  
     Wolf's peach (Bot.), the tomato, or love apple
        ({Lycopersicum esculentum).
  
     Wolf spider (Zool.), any one of numerous species of running
        ground spiders belonging to the genus Lycosa, or family
        Lycosidae. These spiders run about rapidly in search of
        their prey. Most of them are plain brown or blackish in
        color. See Illust. in App.
  
     Zebra wolf (Zool.), a savage carnivorous marsupial
        ({Thylacinus cynocephalus) native of Tasmania; -- called
        also Tasmanian wolf.
        [1913 Webster]

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