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10 definitions found
 for tale
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tale \Tale\ (t[=a]l), n.
     See Tael.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tale \Tale\, n. [AS. talu number, speech, narrative; akin to D.
     taal speech, language, G. zahl number, OHG. zala, Icel. tal,
     tala, number, speech, Sw. tal, Dan. tal number, tale speech,
     Goth. talzjan to instruct. Cf. Tell, v. t., Toll a tax,
     also Talk, v. i.]
     1. That which is told; an oral relation or recital; any
        rehearsal of what has occured; narrative; discourse;
        statement; history; story. "The tale of Troy divine."
        --Milton. "In such manner rime is Dante's tale."
        --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              We spend our years as a tale that is told. --Ps. xc.
                                                    9.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A number told or counted off; a reckoning by count; an
        enumeration; a count, in distinction from measure or
        weight; a number reckoned or stated.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The ignorant, . . . who measure by tale, and not by
              weight.                               --Hooker.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              And every shepherd tells his tale,
              Under the hawthorn in the dale.       --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              In packing, they keep a just tale of the number.
                                                    --Carew.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Law) A count or declaration. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To tell tale of, to make account of. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Therefore little tale hath he told
              Of any dream, so holy was his heart.  --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Anecdote; story; fable; incident; memoir; relation;
          account; legend; narrative.
          [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tale \Tale\ (t[=a]l), v. i.
     To tell stories. [Obs.] --Chaucer. --Gower.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Tael \Tael\, n. [Malay ta[i^]l, a certain weight, probably fr.
     Hind. tola, Skr. tul[=a] a balance, weight, tul to weigh.]
     A denomination of money, in China, worth nearly six shillings
     sterling, or about a dollar and forty cents; also, a weight
     of one ounce and a third. [Written also tale.]
     [1913 Webster] Taen

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  tale
      n 1: a message that tells the particulars of an act or
           occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or
           drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his
           narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain
           adults as well as children" [syn: narrative, narration,
           story, tale]
      2: a trivial lie; "he told a fib about eating his spinach"; "how
         can I stop my child from telling stories?" [syn: fib,
         story, tale, tarradiddle, taradiddle]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  105 Moby Thesaurus words for "tale":
     account, aggregate, all, amount, anecdotage, anecdote,
     back-fence gossip, backbiting, backstabbing, be-all and end-all,
     belittlement, blague, box score, calumny, canard, cast, chitchat,
     chronicle, cock-and-bull story, count, defamation, depreciation,
     difference, disparagement, entirety, enumerate, epic, epos,
     exaggeration, fabrication, fairy tale, falsehood, falsification,
     falsity, farfetched story, farrago, fib, fiction, fish story, flam,
     flimflam, ghost story, gossip, gossiping, gossipmongering,
     gossipry, groundless rumor, half-truth, history, idle talk,
     legal fiction, libel, lie, little white lie, mendacity,
     misrepresentation, myth, narration, narrative, newsmongering,
     number, numerate, piece of gossip, pious fiction, prevarication,
     product, quantity, recital, reckoning, record, report, rumor, saga,
     scandal, score, scuttlebutt, slander, slight stretching, story,
     sum, sum total, summation, talebearing, taletelling, talk,
     tall story, tall tale, tally, taradiddle, tattle, tell,
     the bottom line, the story, the whole story, tittle-tattle, total,
     totality, tote, trumped-up story, untruth, white lie, whole,
     x number, yam, yarn
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015) :

  TALE
  
     Typed Applicative Language Experiment.  M. van Leeuwen.  Lazy,
     purely applicative, polymorphic.  Based on typed second order
     lambda-calculus.  "Functional Programming and the Language
     TALE", H.P. Barendregt et al, in Current Trends in
     Concurrency, LNCS 224, Springer 1986, pp.122-207.
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Tale
     (1.) Heb. tokhen, "a task," as weighed and measured out = tally,
     i.e., the number told off; the full number (Ex. 5:18; see 1 Sam.
     18:27; 1 Chr. 9:28). In Ezek. 45:11 rendered "measure."
     
       (2.) Heb. hegeh, "a thought;" "meditation" (Ps. 90:9); meaning
     properly "as a whisper of sadness," which is soon over, or "as a
     thought." The LXX. and Vulgate render it "spider;" the
     Authorized Version and Revised Version, "as a tale" that is
     told. In Job 37:2 this word is rendered "sound;" Revised Version
     margin, "muttering;" and in Ezek. 2:10, "mourning."
     

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  TALE, Eng. law. The declaration or count was anciently so called in law 
  pleadings. 3 Bl. Com. 293. 
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  TALE, comm. law. A denomination of money in China. In the computation of the 
  ad valorem duty on goods, &c. it is computed at one dollar and forty-eight 
  cents. Act of March 2, 1799, s. 61, 1 Sto. L. U. S. 626. Vide Foreign Coins. 
  
  

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