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4 definitions found
 for terminate
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Terminate \Ter"mi*nate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Terminated; p.
     pr. & vb. n. Terminating.] [L. terminatus, p. p. of
     terminare. See Term.]
     1. To set a term or limit to; to form the extreme point or
        side of; to bound; to limit; as, to terminate a surface by
        a line.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To put an end to; to make to cease; as, to terminate an
        effort, or a controversy.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Hence, to put the finishing touch to; to bring to
        completion; to perfect.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              During this interval of calm and prosperity, he
              [Michael Angelo] terminated two figures of slaves,
              destined for the tomb, in an incomparable style of
              art.                                  --J. S.
                                                    Harford.
        [1913 Webster]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Terminate \Ter"mi*nate\, v. i.
     1. To be limited in space by a point, line, or surface; to
        stop short; to end; to cease; as, the torrid zone
        terminates at the tropics.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To come to a limit in time; to end; to close.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The wisdom of this world, its designs and efficacy,
              terminate on zhis side heaven.        --South.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  terminate
      v 1: bring to an end or halt; "She ended their friendship when
           she found out that he had once been convicted of a crime";
           "The attack on Poland terminated the relatively peaceful
           period after WW I" [syn: end, terminate] [ant: begin,
           commence, get, get down, lead off, set about,
           set out, start, start out]
      2: have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense;
         either spatial or metaphorical; "the bronchioles terminate in
         a capillary bed"; "Your rights stop where you infringe upon
         the rights of other"; "My property ends by the bushes"; "The
         symphony ends in a pianissimo" [syn: end, stop, finish,
         terminate, cease] [ant: begin, start]
      3: be the end of; be the last or concluding part of; "This sad
         scene ended the movie" [syn: end, terminate]
      4: terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or
         position; "The boss fired his secretary today"; "The company
         terminated 25% of its workers" [syn: displace, fire,
         give notice, can, dismiss, give the axe, send away,
         sack, force out, give the sack, terminate] [ant:
         employ, engage, hire]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  98 Moby Thesaurus words for "terminate":
     abandon, abolish, abort, attend, ax, become of, belay, boot out,
     bounce, button up, cancel, cap, carry to completion, cashier,
     cease, clean up, climax, close, close out, close up, come about,
     come of, come out, complete, conclude, crown, culminate,
     cut it out, cut off, desist, determine, develop, discharge,
     discontinue, dismiss, dissolve, drop, drop it, end, ensue,
     eventuate, extinguish, fall out, fare, finalize, finish,
     finish off, finish up, fire, follow, get done, get it over,
     get through, get through with, give over, halt, have done with,
     hold, issue, kick out, knock it off, lay off, leave, leave off,
     mop up, pan out, perfect, perorate, prorogate, prorogue, prove,
     prove to be, quit, recess, refrain, relinquish, renounce, resign,
     resolve, result, rise, round out, sack, scrap, scratch, scrub,
     sign off, stay, stop, top off, top out, turn out, ultimate, unfold,
     wind down, wind up, work out, wrap up
  
  

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