dict.org

The DICT Development Group


Search for:
Search type:
Database:

Database copyright information
Server information
Wiki: Resources, links, and other information


10 definitions found
 for jump
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  jump \jump\ (j[u^]mp), n. [Cf. F. jupe a long petticoat, a
     skirt. Cf. juppon.]
     (a) A kind of loose jacket for men.
     (b) pl. A bodice worn instead of stays by women in the 18th
         century.
         [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  jump \jump\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. jumped (j[u^]mt; 215); p. pr.
     & vb. n. jumping.] [Akin to OD. gumpen, dial. G. gumpen,
     jumpen.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. To spring free from the ground by the muscular action of
        the feet and legs; to project one's self through the air;
        to spring; to bound; to leap.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Not the worst of the three but jumps twelve foot and
              a half by the square.                 --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To move as if by jumping; to bounce; to jolt. "The jumping
        chariots." --Nahum iii. 2.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A flock of geese jump down together.  --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; -- followed by
        with. "It jumps with my humor." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To jump at, to spring to; hence, fig., to accept suddenly
        or eagerly; as, a fish jumps at a bait; to jump at a
        chance.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jump \Jump\, v. t.
     1. To pass over by means of a spring or leap; to overleap;
        as, to jump a stream.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the
        ditch.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              To jump a body with a dangerous physic. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Smithwork)
        (a) To join by a butt weld.
        (b) To thicken or enlarge by endwise blows; to upset.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     5. (Quarrying) To bore with a jumper.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To jump a claim, to enter upon and take possession of land
        to which another has acquired a claim by prior entry and
        occupation. [Western U. S. & Australia] See Claim, n.,
        3.
  
     To jump one's bail, to abscond while at liberty under bail
        bonds. [Slang, U. S.]
  
     To jump the gun, to begin to run (in a footrace) before the
        starting gun has fired; hence, (fig.) to begin any
        activity before the designated starting time.
        [1913 Webster +PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jump \Jump\, a.
     Nice; exact; matched; fitting; precise. [Obs.] "Jump names."
     --B. Jonson.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jump \Jump\, adv.
     Exactly; pat. [Obs.] --Shak.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  jump \jump\ (j[u^]mp), n.
     same as jump-start, n..
     [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  jump \jump\ (j[u^]mp), v. t.
     same as jump-start, v. t..
     [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jump \Jump\, n.
     1. The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound. "To advance
        by jumps." --Locke.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. An effort; an attempt; a venture. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Our fortune lies
              Upon thisjump.                        --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. The space traversed by a leap.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Mining) A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. (Arch.) An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of
        brickwork or masonry.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. A jump-start; as, to get a jump from a passing mmotorist.
        [PJC]
  
     From the jump, from the start or beginning. [Colloq.]
  
     Jump joint.
        (a) A butt joint.
        (b) A flush joint, as of plank in carvel-built vessels.
  
     Jump seat.
        (a) A movable carriage seat.
        (b) A carriage constructed with a seat which may be
            shifted so as to make room for second or extra seat.
            Also used adjectively; as, a jump-seat wagon.
            [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jump-start \Jump"-start`\, n.
     The action or event of jump-starting. For motor vehicles, the
     jump-starting of an engine is also called a jump.
     [PJC] Jump suit

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jupon \Ju*pon"\, Juppon \Jup*pon"\, n. [F. jupon, fr. jupe
     skirt, Sp. aljuba a Moorish garment, Ar. jubba.] [Written
     variously jupe, jump, juppo, etc.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. A sleeveless jacket worn over the armor in the 14th
        century. It fitted closely, and descended below the hips.
        --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A petticoat. --Halliwell.
        [1913 Webster]

Questions or comments about this site? Contact webmaster@dict.org